A wide shot of the Andes Mountains with a snow covered Mt. Ausangate in the center. The 2020 team of eleven are hiking in the foreground on a beautiful day.

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How kindness and talent ensured another obstacle fell
03 Feb
2020
By 2020Visionquest
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Undertaking a Tough Mudder is difficult for certain, although the right team helped ensure success for all of us. When Court Crandall put together the Oberto Heroes of Summer project to emphasize the theme “You Get Out What You Put In”, the results were tremendous. The video clip is a cornerstone for our presentations and a signature moment for our charity in how to deal with obstacles by both attitude and teamwork.

Accessibility is often amongst the toughest challenges faced by many people. All too often there is no support team to help ensure a reasonable chance of access or success in their attempts. A few months back, we released the descriptive audio version of our video to help ensure my sight impaired peers could fully appreciate the experience of “watching” this video. We relied on a feature in YouTube to provide closed captions for those with hearing impairment, but when a school asked me to present for students who were challenged by both sight and hearing challenges, I needed a format of our video with both of these features available even offline. Thanks to the kindness and talent of Paul Scofield with assistance from Jose Acevedo, we once again had our solution which you can experience in the video below:

What makes Paul’s work particularly worth noting is we have never met. He doesn’t have any particular connection to our cause. He had the skills and when asked by his friend Jose, chose to give freely of his time and talents to provide the original descriptive audio version. When we reached out for discussion about an offline closed caption version, he educated us to the difference between open caption (cannot be turned off and on as it’s worked directly into the video) and closed captioning. He provided us with the new versions so that we have four effective videos to ensure a higher level of accessibility for all future presentations.

Best of all is that the students who received this were thrilled to have experienced something rare: a presentation which provided them with material in the formats they best needed. It enabled them to use their various senses to the best of their ability and extract the most from the experience. It allowed them to have a team of support and to believe such teams can exist in the future. It all begins with learning how to build relationships, education and advocacy and often best relies on people who from this understand the benefits a little work can provide. Paul has our thanks for certain and better still will have created something for many others who might often otherwise be overlooked! Court’s message is right: you do get out what you put in. I hope your rewards are many, Paul!

Be well,
Randy Pierce

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