Tag: success



22 Apr 17

By Randy Pierce

“Life is what happens while we are busy making other plans” – John Lennon

Guard House at Machu Picchu.

Guard House at Machu Picchu. On to new adventures!

Recently our focus has been upon the Boston Marathon and while this blog is written in response to it, the concepts are far broader for me. I finished the race in 5 hours and 3 minutes which was longer than I anticipated. It would be so easy to be frustrated and I admit to having endured a little more of that emotion than I would have preferred along the route. Most of the reason for any disappointment is due to expectations which simply didn’t account for all the events which took place to result in our race day experience.

So very often in our many journeys we hope to inflict our plans and our will upon the world and the influence we create can indeed be significant. Yet, when a host of additional factors are introduced, we should be prepared to adapt and adjust our approach as well as our expectations. This simple choice can ensure our ability to celebrate and savor appropriately all aspects of a situation despite any challenges or misdirection involved. Often, if we simply may change our mindset, we become open to the gifts and rewards present in those changes.

I did not anticipate or expect my life would include a journey to blindness. Initially I balked and resisted the journey with a range of approaches from denial, evasion, and even depression. Now, when I reflect upon my life’s journey, I certainly acknowledge that I would welcome my sight but still delight in the blindness for the lessons and gifts it has brought into my life have helped bring me to people and places I likely would not have experienced without the gifts my loss of sight brought to my life. Hard as that may be for some to believe, it took my personal acceptance and adaptation to realize that along with the detriments and real challenges came a wealth of benefits as well.

So when I reflect in my Marathon journey, there are many things about the day going differently which could have and did bring about frustration. I wish I’d have adjusted my mindset more quickly to appreciate some of the gifts. I’ll share just two of them here as evidence to my feeling.

Rebecca and Randy running in the Boston Marathon

Rebecca and Randy running strong! Photo courtesy of MA Association for the Blind.

A strategic error on my part caused the work of my first guide Rebecca to be tremendously more challenging for most of the first 13 miles and thus even made the final 5 of her 18 guiding miles more challenging. At the transition point we intended to just switch guides and go but we took a full stop for a moment to share and appreciate the work we’d just accomplished together. It was amongst the hardest 18 miles of guiding anyone had ever had to undertake and my pride of her and appreciation for her as a guide and as a friend was simply overflowing. That emotion sustains still and likely will for all time as a gift she gave me and as an achievement we earned together.

The second is similar in potency but vastly different in need. The circumstances of the race with collisions and falls had taken a toll on me. I have significant balance issues which once placed me in a wheelchair and which, when put under too much duress of the wrong type, can impact me tremendously.

Randy and Tom running along the Marathon route.

Randy and Tom working hard. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Jordan.

This was the state in which Tom roughly took over his guiding and as my vertigo began to ramp up beyond control, it was not possible for me to run in the normal rigid tether approach that we use. Tom was still recovering from being unwell, meaning barely over his own pneumonia! And what I needed was his sturdy shoulder for support as well as his run guidance. This was like no run we’d ever shared together. He was a rock and adapted, encouraged, supported and helped guide me, not just to the finish but to the celebration the accomplishment deserved despite my desire to be frustrated and disappointed and yes overly apologetic! My gift this day was to celebrate the race in a totally different way and better still to celebrate my finish with finer friends than even when we had begun the journey!

Thank you Rebecca and Tom! So perhaps when you are next facing change, frustration or disappointment you’ll remember John Lennon’s quote and more quickly find your way to see the gifts a better vision provides us all if we only learn to look.

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8 Apr 17

By Randy Pierce

Randy invites you to help us reach out goal!

Randy invites you to help us reach out goal!

If you are already fully versed on the Peak Potential Table Sprint Challenge and just want to join the team – Get Started Here!

Running the Boston Marathon is both a challenge and an experience I savor personally. The most meaningful and valuable work in my life is what I pursue through the strides of the 2020 Vision Quest charity. This year I’m combining these experiences somewhat by inviting you to be part of them both.

As Boston is the signature marathon in the world, our Peak Potential Dinner and Auction is the signature event whereby our charity is able to continue the successful work each year.

While the event itself is on November 18, 2017, we begin our ticket sales on April 10 with a goal of selling 26 tables prior to my traversing the 26 miles to the finish of the race. This would effectively ensure a sell-out of our event and as you might guess will be motivating me mile by mile.

I honestly thought the goal was as difficult as all the training in New England winter, and yet the early responses from many friends suggest we may indeed have a chance to reach this incredible goal. To help encourage our success we are offering a table of 8 at our lowest discounted rate of $500 from the start of ticket sales until I cross the finish line. We’ll accept your commitment, registration, and promise of a check or online payments as well as welcome any motivational message or image you may wish to send along with your table reservation.

You see, we’ll be announcing mile by mile one table reservation at a time on our website blog and social media to appreciate and celebrate our community and to help motivate me as I’m working my way along the historic 26.2 mile route from Hopkinton to Boston.

So just to review: you’ll be signing up to enjoy a tremendous evening on November 18 at the Courtyard by Marriott in Nashua, NH. You will be helping to support the worthy mission of 2020 Vision Quest and our highly acclaimed educational programs to schools throughout New England. Finally you’ll be motivating me and inspiring me as I’m striving to run the 120th Boston Marathon on April 17, Patriots Day of course!

So once again: Let’s Get Started Here!

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18 Mar 17

By Randy Pierce

An early picture of Autumn, Randy's Guide Dog partner, who arrived in Nashua on March 16, 2014.

An early picture of Autumn, Randy’s Guide Dog partner, who arrived in Nashua on March 16, 2014.

Autumn’s joyous exuberance was evident as she bounded into me on our first meeting on March 16, 2014. Her affectionate, loving approach won my heart immediately but she had some legendary paws to fill in the working world.

I was determined to keep an open mind and remove expectations to let our working relationship develop based upon the skills and qualities each of us brought to the team under the supervision of Guiding Eyes Trainer Chrissie Vetrano. I had some success in this approach as I had transitioned from Ostend to Quinn and understood the benefits of being open minded to the strengths and challenges which each of us bring to any partnership.

I was not without a little baggage of my own I needed to address for the journey. It wasn’t entirely seamless out in the working world and that’s why we have trainers and the guide school support system to help us manage the many possible challenges and ensure we have the skills and tools to work through the difficult days in a steadily improving fashion. Autumn wanted to please me and I wanted my special little girl to succeed with me as well.

Randy, Tracy, and Autumn on a mountainside, one big happy family!

Randy, Tracy, and Autumn on a mountainside, one big happy family!

Three years later I’m amazed at how far we’ve come. I’ve learned to understand her body language to tell when her exuberance is driving her more than her thinking and she’s learned to realize when I’m allowing myself to be a little distracted and need a little correction to her warnings for me. Yes, we both still make some mistakes on our journey but we’ve built an understanding of when we are smooth together, when we are challenged and how to address it so we can do the necessary work even amidst challenge.

Better still, the challenging days are the rarity and the smooth days are so very common. I step out of my home with confidence each day and harness her expecting and receiving the freedom and independence which is such a part of a dog guide team. She gives me hours back each day in the efficiency with which we can do our tasks. Using my cane I find walking to the bus stop is 15 minutes normally, 30 minutes on trash day and “just stay home” on trash and recycle day.

Autumn looking bashful

“Stop, dad, you’re embarrassing me!”

Working with Autumn it is a five minute relaxed and mentally free stroll. She strides eagerly ahead of me and slightly to my left watching for the obstacles and trying to determine which destination is next for us. I try to keep her guessing a little and reflect that it is not just the hours she gives me back each day but the quality of the hours improved by spending my time with her.

So as I celebrate my third year with my wonderful Black and Tan Labrador Retriever, I realize we are in the sweet spot. Our bond is complete and deep, our skills have come to a great understanding, and our eagerness to adventure together is buoyed by our mutual (ahem) youthful approach to the world. I love her work, I love the impact of her work on my life, I love her impact upon my life and so it is not surprisingly how completely and proudly I love my Autumn. Thank you for three wonderful years and I look forward hopefully and eagerly to many more ahead!

Autumn lies on top of Randy, pinning him to the floor.

Autumn’s love and exuberance bowls us over!

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4 Mar 17

By Randy Pierce

As Chairman of the Board of Directors for the New Hampshire Association for the Blind, I have been actively and passionately dedicated to ensuring their best ability to effectively meet the ever growing needs of the sight-challenged. I help to direct the vision of the organization in positive ways and one of those paths brought President and CEO David Morgan to his position just over one year ago. He has helped inspire and guide the branding change which  I personally believe is vital to the organization’s success and, more importantly, the success of thousands of people who have been artificially limited to some extent by a naming convention.

I’ll allow David’s excellent announcement to stand below as a guest blog as well as on the redesigned website for Future In Sight which I encourage you to visit. I do want to address the word blind candidly and comfortably in advance. The organization will continue to provide excellent support, education, and advocacy for the blind and  visually impaired as before. There is no apprehension in use of the word “blind.” We have learned that the wrong timing of that word’s introduction to someone who is experiencing sight loss often inhibits their acceptance of needed services and even can impact a caring medical eye professional from choosing to refer to an organization with that name due to the strong emotional results commonly experienced.

We want to ensure we can welcome these thousands of people to receiving their needed services, education, and support while also providing the same high quality blindness services and advocacy proven over 100 years of valued Charity Service here in Concord NH. That said, I leave you with David’s excellent words below.

CHANGE IS IN THE AIR: WELCOME TO FUTURE IN SIGHT

FEBRUARY 28, 2017

WRITTEN BY DAVID MORGAN

After 105 years of working to improve the lives of blind and visually impaired people in our state, today is a new day.

The New Hampshire Association for the Blind will now be known as Future In Sight. We are so proud to announce our name change, and we believe that Future In Sight more accurately represents our clientele since 93 percent of our clients are visually impaired – not blind – and our geographic scope extends to states bordering New Hampshire. Our name aims to capture the optimism and hopefulness of new technologies, therapies, and programs that are always on the horizon to enhance the quality of life for our clients.

YA Gunstock kidrunning Article

Providing education, rehabilitation, and support services is about helping individuals build core skills in school or in their home, and helping them engage their world socially. We accomplish this through a multitude of programs that include recreation, peer support, and technology. We help individuals live and thrive with sight loss! Our new brand must be unique and memorable and reflect this new hope we bring to thousands who need our help, and we believe Future In Sight does just that.

Since 1912, we have continuously improved our offerings to the community so this is just one more step in that direction. Last year alone, we began working with infants and toddlers for the first time since we were founded; we doubled our education staff; and we started offering recreational activities to help clients lead their best lives.

There are more than 30,000 people with visual impairments in the state of New Hampshire, so we know we can be reaching many more clients who need, and would thrive with, our services in rural corners, inside our cities, and along the borders. Our name needs to be more inclusive and reflect the full range of services we provide to babies, children, adults, and seniors around our state and beyond. Our name also needs to resonate with a range of our partners and referral networks, which includes schools, eye doctors, primary care physicians, donors, the Veterans Administration, the state of New Hampshire, nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

So, after many months of hard work and collaboration with Proportion Design, members of our staff, our Board, and our community, exhaustive research into our history, our mission, and our hopes and aspirations for the future, we developed this new name and a logo that better reflect the amazing organization we are becoming. We look forward to this fresh chapter as Future In Sight and continue to help clients live fulfilling, independent lives!

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4 Feb 17

By Randy Pierce

Jose leads Randy up the Barranco Wall on a steep and rocky mountainside.“The Holman Prize is not meant to save the world or congratulate someone for leaving the house. This prize will spark unanticipated accomplishments in the blindness community. You will see blind people doing things that surprise and perhaps even confuse you. These new LightHouse prizes will change perceptions about what blind people are capable of doing.”

–Bryan Bashin, CEO at LightHouse 

I chose a life of independence and freedom based upon believing in possibility, problem solving, and perseverance. While my blindness slowed me on occasion and helped me stumble on several occasions, I’ve been fortunate to be surrounded by friends and a community which rarely even attempted to hold me back and more commonly joined efforts with me to help us all reach for our peak potential. In this, I’m incredibly fortunate as well as in the resolve to not allow those other times to overly impact my confidence or determination.

Along the path, I learned how much work remains to be accomplished in the area of awareness to encourage the vast majority to welcome these reasonable approaches. It is why I’m excited to share the news and to ask all of you to help me share this news as well with the sighted and visually impaired communities as well!

The Holman Prize: $25,000.00
The Holman Prize for Blind Ambition is an annual award to finance blind adventurers in pursuing their most ambitious projects. In January, the contest begins with a challenge: blind applicants must submit a first-round pitch, in the form of a 90-second YouTube video.

Deadline for submission: Feb. 28th at 12pm PST 

Click here to learn more.

I love several great aspects of this project. First, it emphasizes my sight-impaired peers to be creative in developing an adventurous goal emphasizing travel, communication, and connection towards the cause of demonstrating ability awareness. Second, it creates a stage for all of the world to see these goals and dreams as well as many of them hopefully coming to fruition. I’m so enthused by it that despite my many adventures I want to develop something beyond my prior scope to suggest in my own 90-second video.

So please, take a look at their message, their contest, and the results already underway! I’m proud of what I’ve accomplished and I’m just one person with the limitations of my own focus. It is a world full of talented people, some of whom might just need this push to reach for their own peak potential!

Man on a nighttime mountain: The Holman prize for blind ambition

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28 Jan 17

By Randy Pierce

Team of 2020 Vision Quest hikers from the epic accomplishment of the 48th summits in one winter on March 10, 2012. Taken on East Cannon with the Lafayette Ridge in the background on a beautiful winter day!“Players win Games, Teams win Championships” – Bill Bellichick

I attribute many of my successful accomplishments to the positive results of teamwork. At the most basic daily level my teamwork with my dog guide enhances my life tremendously and I’ve learned to find, build, maintain, grow and enhance teams along my journey and it has taken me to incredible heights. I’ve long supported the suggestion of team as an acronym: T.E.A.M. – Together – Everyone – Achieves – More.

Since my childhood, I’ve been a fan of football for the blending of strategy, myriad athletic types, and exceptional reliance on teamwork for success. I have always had an appreciation for the hard-working over-achiever and strive to emulate that personally. The New England Patriots were my home team and for much of my life were not particularly successful, but still I enjoyed the lessons I learned about teamwork.

When the ultimate team player for me joined our squad in 1996 and happened to share my birthday, I quickly became a Tedy Bruschi fan, though it was the 2001 team which reminded a nation in their famous “choosing to be introduced as a team” entrance to the Super Bowl just how much value comes from learning to work together to lift each other up to better than the sum of the individual parts. Sixteen years later, most of the individuals have been replaced multiple times but the team’s first approach and success have sustained.

Regardless of the team anyone supports or even an interest in the sport, there’s a worthy lesson in Bill Bellichick’s quote which is valuable in all of our life approaches. Simply put, there is tremendous value in being the best individuals we can become and we will likely gain much success for personal development. Ultimately, however, the greatest accomplishments and the lasting success for the long term are more commonly achieved by learning to build our team, maintain our team and work together towards the important goals. At the behest of several conferences, I’ve developed workshops on these approaches to “team” which are beyond the scope of a single blog. I will say that commitment and communication are essential components. The specific methods adjust for the varied types of people, circumstances, and goals as well, but if we want to reach the pinnacles of accomplishment, it is worth the effort.

All that said, it is Super Bowl week and even in my actual football fandom I think you’ll find this Sports Emmy Award-nominated piece from 2007 showcases how community is involved in my approach even to fandom. Community, after all, is just another type of team! Along the way you might find some emotionally charged moments about my life as well including my description of the very last moment of sight I ever had in this world. Enjoy!

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31 Dec 16

By Randy Pierce

My “vision” for 2017 as it pertains to both the 2020 Vision Quest and myself is admittedly fraught with a little more doubt than usual. I’m generally a confident planner with a fair bit of will and determination, yet that was not enough for me to deliver 2016 in quite all of the ways I hoped.

I still count it as a successful year despite the many setbacks and it is for those setbacks I have a little trepidation in setting my sights on the peaks ahead for this year. I still would rather reach for the highest summits and learn to celebrate the higher altitudes even when I’m not reaching every peak with perfection. I think if I reached every goal set forth at the start of the year, perhaps I wouldn’t have challenged myself quite enough.

So with this in mind, some of these goals are reaches but most are reasonable stretches given the supportive team striving for these goals together.

Student posing with Randy and Autumn at schoolSchool Outreach

As the heart of our mission, I’d like to see us elevate from the 54,000 students we’ve reached in schools at this point to more than 60,000 by this time next year! We continue to receive tremendously positive testimonials from students, teachers and administrators as well as parents, so perhaps you might want to volunteer or refer a school to our “For Educators” page that they may schedule a visit from Autumn and and me.

The Book

Delayed by my health challenges, the book writing project halted near the halfway point and that is a setback I consider unacceptable. Its return is a high priority and several other pursuits are getting relegated behind the priority this writing deserves. The plan is to have it finished by the arrival of my birthday in June!

Running Old and New

First up in the running goals is our return to the Boston Marathon with the ability to train properly and appreciate a fully healthy run. We’ll announce the guiding details in the near future but the training program is already underway and going well.

It will be my first of three marathons this year, as I intend to run the Nashua “Gate City Marathon” in May. A special feature of that marathon is the relay option in which five-mile loops will enable many to be part of the celebration as partial participants or spectators from the downtown central location of my hometown!

Lastly, it is my plan to return to the California International Marathon in December and once again attempt to compete for the B1 National Marathon Championship which I was fortunate to win back in 2014.

One other novelty run mixed into the many enjoyable local runs in which I’m often eager to participate is a 7.6-mile run highly touted for having only a single hill. It’s a hill I know rather well since the race occurs along the Mt. Washington Auto Road. Getting into this race is a little tricky but I’ll be doing my best to gain entrance so that in June I can find yet another way to the top of the rock pile infamous for the worst weather in the world.

2020 Vision Quest team on the top of KilimanjaroWorld Traveling

Our Kilimanjaro team has not finalized the late summer plans but it looks very much like a trip to Peru and the Inca trail may be in order. We may visit the ancient city of Machu Picchu or the incredible Rainbow Mountain or even some other as yet undetermined treasure of the Andes. We simply miss the team and experience and so are seeking yet another opportunity.

Certainly there are many more goals great and small which are in my thoughts and which may develop. I want to help the Peak Potential team improve on what many felt was our best ever Peak Potential event last November. I want to always ensure I’m learning, growing and helping others around me do similarly. I hope you’ll help hold me to some of these goals and perhaps join me in the achievements and celebrations!

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18 Dec 16

By Randy Pierce

Randy and Quinn on Mt. Monroe.

Randy and Quinn on Mt. Monroe.

The plan suggested it was to be a demonstration of Ability Awareness. It was to be an appreciation of the diverse gifts provided by winter hiking. It was a chance to savor the easier footing I would experience as snow filled in those twisty, rocky, root-filled routes we call trails in the White Mountains of NH. The experience would prove to be far greater in scope than I ever realized and like so many things in life, the vastly heightened challenge enhanced the rewards received in like proportion.

The greatest gifts were the many friendships found along the trails from Greg Neault at the base of Hale to Justin Sylvester who took the photo to the right and Dina Sutin who filmed the teaser below as well as the accompanying film. Many friends were found and forged along those trails along with the lessons of perseverance, planning, and preparation. As winter arrives five years later, I’m so vastly different than I was when that first December 22 climb of Tecumseh began. I thought it worth a moment to look back and share a little with all of you who were with me and some who have joined us since those days.

I have so many thankful moments, so many delightful moments, and so many inspiring moments, I could fill a book well beyond the scope of this blog. As my holiday gift to the blog readers out here, I will share a tale in the blog comments for every person who comments and requests one. Similarly for our social media friends if you share our post and tag me so I can be aware of the share, I’ll give you a tale on your post as well. Happy Holidays and my thanks for the greatest gift of all that winter: Quinn’s incredible work, love, and dedication.

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26 Nov 16

By Randy Pierce

The ever affectionate Autumn interrupted my attempts at typing a blog so I provide a short video on the heart of our mission and how we get there… after a overcoming the Autumn distraction factor!

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13 Nov 16

By Beth Foote

The Peak Potential Team thanks you for your support!

The Peak Potential Team thanks you for your support!

“And you were all there.”

That’s what Randy said on Saturday night during his remarks at 2020 Vision Quest’s 7th Annual Peak Potential Dinner and Charity Auction. He ran through the history of this amazing event–from its humble beginnings in 2010 with 65 people in the Manchester Derryfield Country Club, to last night when we packed 200+ into our massive ballroom in the Courtyard Marriott in Nashua. He told how, in our first year, we gave $2,020 each to Guiding Eyes for the Blind and New Hampshire Association for the Blind, and that now, 6 years later, we’ve been able to give $20,000 to each association each year for the last few years.

“And you were all there.”

In a lively ballroom full of friends and supporters, Randy shared some of his own journey. He shared triumphs: climbing all 48 4,000-foot peaks in a single winter, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, running two Boston Marathons. He also shared sorrows and hardships: the death of his father on the morning of the 2012 Peak Potential, the death of his beloved Guide Dog Quinn a little over a year later, and a resurgence of his mysterious medical condition over the last year that caused frequent blackout episodes. Randy took his audience through his personal highs and lows of the last few years, and came back to this statement:

“And you were all there.”

Both this event and 2020 Vision Quest have grown by leaps and bounds every year. At Peak Potential 2016, with our new expanded space and biggest auction yet, we are expected to have raised more money than any Peak Potential so far. 2020 Vision Quest has reached a total of 53,000 children in our school presentations, 10,000 just this year. We’ve now created the “2020 Visionary” award to honor those who embody the principles of 2020 Vision Quest, and presented it to our inaugural recipient Dr. John Dagianis. Dr. Dagianis’s quick diagnosis of Randy’s condition over a decade ago helped Randy save partial sight at the time, and he is also widely known for his skill, compassion, and humanitarianism.

But what keeps breathing life into our mission is the joy, friendship, and support of our community. Year after year, both at Peak Potential and in between, our community comes together to support us and each other. It’s because of you that we can keep making the difference that is so important to make.

Last night, Michelle Croteau, a teacher at the Adeline C. Marston School in Hampton, NH, gave a presentation about how important our mission was to her students. She said that 2020 Vision Quest shows that “turning a vision into a reality is possible if you just believe in yourself.”

Our mission to encourage people to achieve their dreams and to financially give back to Guiding Eyes and NHAB wouldn’t be possible without you. By believing in us and coming back, year after year, you’ve helped us turn the vision of this event and our charity into reality. Together, we’ve built something that’s amazing and meaningful. Together, we’ve helped make a difference to so many people who need it.

“And you were all there.”

So thank you, from the bottom of our hearts. We are humbled and honored by your presence and your support. We hope you’ll keep on coming! We can’t do it without you.

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