Tag: Randy



30 Jan 16

By Randy Pierce

“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” Dr. Seuss

Randy and team watching the sunrise on Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Randy and team watching the sunrise on Mt. Kilimanjaro.

I just emerged from a difficult anniversary as it has now been two years that the Mighty Quinn is gone from us. The week leading up to it, WGBH in Boston and several other public television stations re-aired NHPTV’s “Windows to the Wild” episode of “Hiking in the Dark.” How incredible is it to know television stations air programming to honor our marvelous boy and his incredible accomplishments?

If you missed this New England Emmy Award-winning show, you may find it on our website in the collection of worthy videos we keep for your perusal.

This week, we release my January writing collections intended for the book I hope to release at the end of the year. Those who have chosen can be pre-reading and commenting upon the story of my life’s adventures and the lessons found along the path.

If you wish to join in that experience, I refer you to our invitation for that opportunity.

Few of us in this world are spared the grief and pain of losing a loved one to death’s cruelty. Many of us understand all too well the bonds we can form with our beloved pets. My Dog Guides are so much more to me than a pet — and their loss takes a piece of me with them each time. Fortunately for me, their presence in my life leaves such a larger legacy of love, learning, and growth that I am far more for the experience of having had them in my life. As I ease away from the sadness and nostalgic reflections brought by Quinn’s passing, I want to share with you just a few paragraphs which I’m releasing to those following the progress of my book as mentioned above. It was a gift of sorts I gave to myself and an honor I felt my Quinn deserved when this year provided the opportunity. This is from a chapter I call “The Ashes of Kilimanjaro.”

***

I was physically exhausted. Despite the freezing temperatures, my cheeks were wet with the salty warm tears pushed out of my sightless eyes by the heaving sobs lurching from deep within my abdomen. All of my muscles ached with their oxygen-deprived exertions which had propelled me to the top of this Pillar of the Earth. I had not slept for two days and three nights which left an exhaustion nearly as complete as my grief. My hand trembled slightly as I used my index finger to slide through the weather-crushed rock which felt like sand to me as I began to form the letters of his name. Q – u – i – n – n.

Below his name I pressed my fingers more firmly and deeply to create a hole. Reaching into the chest pocket of my snow pants I withdrew the pristine handkerchief which had been so carefully prepared one week earlier.

Tracy and I had gone to the meditation room in the back corner of our home in Nashua, NH. In that room the ashes of my three boys are kept in a place of honor for the love, life, and joy we shared together. I hold none of my dogs more dear in my heart for each unconditionally and entirely gave entirely of their being to the partnership we shared. I too gave each my best love and care as I learned from them and with them so many lessons of being a better participant in the world we share together.

We pause there beneath a beautiful tapestry of Quinn from our final hike together. Pearls have been worked into the piece to provide a braille translation of the quote from Ghandi. I think briefly on Rachel Morris for giving us the quote, Kevin Gagnon for giving us the tapestry, but mostly of my Quinn gone from us for over a year and yet still so powerfully with me in everything I attempt. Tracy and I unfold the crisp new white pocket square and each of us reach into Quinn’s urn and  collect some of his ashes for the journey. I’m surprised to feel the bits of bone whichare mingled within the ashes and it pains me for reasons I cannot fully explain. Ever so gently, I refold the handkerchief with his ashes now held within. I tuck that into the chest pocket of the ¾ snowpants which will be worn only on the summit ascent. 

A sob shakes me from my remembrance and I feel Jose place a comforting hand on my shoulder. I pull open the handkerchief and ease his ashes into the hole. I feel the tears flowing steadily and I allow the drops to roll off my cheek and into this honorary grave I’ve created here atop the tallest stand alone mountain in the world. I mutter to myself what may have seemed barely coherent to Jose from our isolated retreat here on Uhuru’s peak. “I love you so much, my dear sweet Quinn-boy. You gave so much to me. It was you who taught me to fully walk again, it was you who taught me to run and who ever so patiently guided me to learn how to hike. We shared a lot of peaks, my beautiful boy, and all because you believed in me, encouraged me, supported me with an unrivaled spirit. Of course you are here with me today too and while I may never reach a higher mountain summit, we will forever bound across limitless peaks of love and achievement. A bit of you will always belong here as your love and friendship are the highest summit any of us could ever know.”

Then I simply cried until there was no more water for my tears. I hugged Jose tightly loving his friendship even as my heart yearned most for the thick furry body of Quinn to force itself under my arm and against my side as he did so many times in our past. Ever so slowly, we turned back to our team gathered around the summit sign for this tallest of Kilimanjaro’s peaks.

***

Learn how you can read more book excerpts.

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23 Jan 16

By Randy Pierce

Autumn looking downcast

Autumn doesn’t like hearing “No.”

I have some really exciting news about 2020 Vision Quest to share with you next week but we have a little more work to be fully ready for that update. Instead, I’m going to share with you an important message for all of us. It’s one with which I struggle on a regular basis. It is the simple choice to say “No.”

That tiny little two-letter word is an essential one if we truly want to be fair to ourselves and all the possible opportunities in our lives. Yes (there I go again), it’s  enticing to support the many heartfelt, meaningful, and essential requests which we receive in our lives. Yes, it’s good to be involved and connected and contributing. The trouble is that if we say “yes” too many times, there is a consequence on ourselves and on our ability to honor the “yes” we’ve given to various opportunities. Simply put, saying “yes” too much will devalue the benefit of our ability once we’ve saturated our time and energy beyond reasonable limits.

“My early attempts at saying no were often far from graceful but with practice even my no came from a place of love.” — Susan Gregg

While I am an advocate of the “Believe in Possibility” approach and strive to improve time management techniques to allow me to be successful, healthy and happy; I’ve discovered along the way what Susan Gregg learned early on in her life. My choice to say “No” empowers the times I will say “yes.” For me if it’s really difficult to refuse something because I so very much want to be a part of it, then I take the time to list out my responsibilities and priorities and take a look at where this new opportunity fits into that list. I evaluate which of the items on that list I would choose to tell “No” in order to say “yes” to this new opportunity. This comparative approach helps make me more confident in giving that ultimate no the the appropriate place. Before I allow myself the self-sacrificing denial of rest and recovery time, I’ve now established a minimum mandatory level for that time because it is essential to me.

This is the only big catch in this entire process other than the disappointment I feel in telling someone “No.” The good news is that Susan got that right as well with the suggestion that we’ll improve the more we practice. I don’t believe practice makes perfect but I do believe it usually makes better.

If you aren’t ready to practice your “no” just yet, then I’d like to invite you to donate some of your valuable time, creativity and even charitable donations to this 2020 Vision Quest effort! ;-)

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16 Jan 16

By Randy Pierce

Randy and Jose running and determined

Jose and Randy run the California International Marathon in December 2014.

“We do not plan to fail, we fail to plan.” – Lorrie Ross

I was excited to announce that my good friend and fellow 2020 Vision Quest Board Member, Jose Acevedo, would be running as my guide for the Boston Marathon. But now it’s time for the discussion of some details. Just making the announcement won’t help either of us run the Superbowl of road races. It takes a plan and plenty of hard work in implementing the plan.

Most marathons require roughly 18 weeks of training in order to prepare for the endurance experience impact upon the body. Running it as a team requires being in synchronicity sufficiently to ensure the best chance of success. So Jose and I reached out to Greg Hallorman, a good friend and excellent run coach. We use a modified version of the Hal Higdon training program with a few lessons from our past marathon experiences.

Having very successfully run the California International Marathon together in 2014, we understand fairly well how to work together. There is an additional burden on my guide to be able to find their comfortable pace for not only running their marathon but having the reserves mentally and physically to be my guide. This includes the breathing room to call out warnings of obstacles we might not be able to simply steer around such as a pothole or manhole cover. It involves tracking not only the pathway they are running, but the wider path for me with an extra bit of attention to provide warning time for me when those obstacles cannot be avoided. The guide often has to alert other runners of our presence and the visual challenge to help us be good citizens to our fellow runners. On the very crowded Boston course this can be an especially significant challenge.

Given these factors, Jose set our goal race pace as 8:40 minutes/mile as our target. This was the basis for our plan. Added to this is the expectation that four days per week of running was the right and reasonable limit for the rest of our busy schedules.

This does not mean that we only train on four days, however. There are two additional days of cross training for roughly an hour each time. These days help develop a different range of muscle motion, enhance our cardiovascular conditioning as well as hopefully support our body clearing lactic acid build-up from the running. Jose often uses his Kilimanjaro favorite of stair climbing at his high-rise office building, I tend to visit my local YMCA and put the time on an indoor bicycle. Many alternatives can exist to help supplement the core run training with cross training.

While staging to ever longer runs as we near the April 18 Boston Marathon date, our typical week might look like this glance for the week of January 18:

Jose on a training run.

Jose on a training run.

Monday: 60 Minutes of Cross training

*Thanks to Rick Perreira who drives me to the YMCA Each Monday Morning, helps me with the touch screen cycles and takes me home!

Tuesday: 5 mile run with 4x hill repeats in the middle (alternates weeks with speed intervals)

*Thanks to Tracy for pushing me and helping with the timing on the key points of this hard workout!

Wednesday: 60 Minutes of Cross training

*Thanks to Alex Newbold who drives me to the YMCA each Wednesday morning, helps me with the touch screen cycles, and takes me home!

Thursday: 6 miles of “tempo run,” meaning 2 miles of warm-up at 9:00 minutes/mile, 3 miles of “lactic threshold”at 8:10 minutes/mile, and 1 mile cool-down at reduced/recovery speed like 9:30 minutes/mile.

* Thanks to Matt Shapiro who works hard to give me this very early morning speed push most Thursdays!

Friday: My one rest day to recover and prepare for the weekend push!

Saturday: 6 miles of race pace (8:40 minutes/mile)

Sunday: 11 mile “easy pace” run (8:45-9:15 typically)

* While we often switch Saturday and Sunday, Rob Webber has been steadfast on longer and faster runs with various guides or treadmill options for the other day as necessary!

Those weekend-long runs will rise to 20 miles and as the snows fall, roads become icy and temperatures can drop; training for Boston is simply a challenge. Meanwhile my counterpart in Jose will contend with Texas temperatures and we check in with each other regularly to see if our progress remains encouragingly comfortable. All this work for an incredible celebration together as we share the legendary experience which has become the Boston Marathon. Hopefully some of you will be helping us out with encouragement throughout the training and especially on our big day.

Boston Strong!

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9 Jan 16

By Randy Pierce

“Long after the names of the medalists have faded from our minds, you will be remembered for having finished, for having tried so hard, for having a father to demonstrate the strength of his love for his son. I thank you, and I will always remember your race and I will always remember you – the purest, most courageous example of grit and determination I have seen.”

– 1992 Canadian Olympic Athlete to Derek Redmond

My friend and running coach, Greg Hallorman, recently shared the below video with me. While he unsuccessfully searched for a more audibly descriptive video than what I’m sharing below, I had the power of his emotional description in support. What transpires in this video is one of the strongest demonstrations of grit, determination, and parental love. It moved me and I hope it may do similarly for all of you. All of us no doubt face moments when we may wish to quit. Quitting is an option only when we succumb to the urge to quit. There are many ways to win, most notably giving your absolute truest and best effort to the goal – especially when it’s about succeeding far more than winning.

Here is the video of Derek Redmond, a British 400-meter champion. In the semi-final round of the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, he begins strong when an event occurs to change his life. It involves his choice, his father’s choice, and the crowd’s choice, and readily becomes one of the most memorable moments of Olympic history. I hope you’ll choose to watch and experience it for yourself:

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2 Jan 16

By Randy Pierce

Randy signs a book

Possible future book signing?

Those in attendance at our Sixth Annual Peak Potential Dinner and Auction in November were afforded a very limited opportunity to be an integral part of the experience ahead. For those not in attendance, we want to now invite you enjoy a part of that experience. We have created a private and secure website where each month throughout this year I’ll upload a portion of my writings intended for the book. This will allow for all those participating to have an advanced reading of all the sections under consideration for the final product well in advance of that book release. You’ll also have insight into sections which while very pertinent to me may not make the final entry into the book. As such you’ll have a more complete and full experience than those who ultimately receive the final version of the book which we anticipate releasing next year.

How does this become possible for you? For a donation of $55 to 2020 Vision Quest, you may have your email added to the list receiving the monthly release of my writings to our secure site. You’ll be able to visit that site at your convenience and review not only that month’s release but the entire year’s uploads. This is a great means for you to help support the incredible work of 2020 Vision Quest while proving yourself with a very rare and special gift into my newest and perhaps most epic quest of all.

Randy and quinn on Mt. Monroe.

Randy and quinn on Mt. Monroe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit this page to make your donation and join us for this experience.

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20 Dec 15

By Randy Pierce

Christmas photo with Randy, Tracy, and Autumn

Happy holidays from Randy, Tracy, and Autumn!

I still well recall the excitement I felt as a boy when the Christmas season approached. It wasn’t just Christmas morning when presents were opened, though I certainly loved that time too. It was the cheery greetings that flowed from a larger community of people willing to reach out. It was the festive lights, music, and even the crisp air which invigorated me.

Today there is still magic for all of those things, and the spirit of joy and kindness which is encouraged so much more. I believe very strongly that we have the opportunity to fill our entire year with the kind of positivity and enthusiasm which I felt and still feel during the holidays.

I believe the greatest gift to our own spirit, the best uplifting of our own emotional health, is achieved when we find ways to help others. Our efforts with 2020 Vision Quest are a means by which the incredible team provides such help to a much larger community. I am, however, most blessed with the chance to regularly and directly hear the many positive interactions which follow our presentations. Each time someone shares appreciation in all the myriad ways, I am receiving the best Christmas gift ever. In this way, 2020 Vision Quest fills my life with positivity — and while Christmas with Tracy and Autumn will be very special, I get a most precious gift all year long.

I wish for all of you the peace, love, and joy for the season and the rest of the year!

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5 Dec 15

By Randy Pierce

I’m thrilled to share my second TEDx talk with all of you! My first talk was centered on the notion of how all of us can and should reach for our peak potential. This second talk was asked to fit to the theme of a “Brand New Day” and put focus upon a valuable perspective on Transition Trauma and Social Risk Management.

You may recall that back in October I shared how I develop a presentation as I prepared to give the talk and now you can directly see the results below. I also include that blog link here so you can perhaps gain insight into the process and compare the two different talks.

If you, as I do, believe there is value in these talks, please consider sharing them with all those who might similarly benefit. Thank you again for the tremendous support which helps inspire me to be reaching for new heights!

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29 Nov 15

By Randy Pierce

Peter Houde and Randy running at the Boston Marathon 2015.

Peter Houde and Randy running at the Boston Marathon 2015.

While there have been many blogs about why and how I run, there are precious few to talk about the incredible number of  blind athletes brought together by Richard Hunter, the USABA, and many other organizations responsible for the National Marathon Championship held at the California International Marathon December 6, 2015. I cannot say enough good things about this event, the inspirational people behind the scenes and the incredible stories which will join me on the course.

As such, let me just encourage you all to visit an excellent blog about the event.

Note: You’ll find my bio in the list along with some incredible individuals with whom I’m proud to be sharing a course.

For those perhaps connecting to the event more personally through me, here’s a little bit of information. There are three divisions of visually impaired runners. I’m the B1 division. This is the effectively total blindness category. While B2 and B3 each have significant vision impairment, they have some level of usable vision. Not surprisingly, the B3, most sighted of the divisions, typically has the fastest race times as well.

I always run with a sighted guide and we use a rigid tether. Guiding me this year will be a pair of sighted runners each taking a half of the race. First up is a volunteer whom I have yet to meet except via email. A local of New England, he lives in the Bay area and has very kindly agreed to take me the first 13.1 miles to where I’ll meet up with my friend Peter Houde who is flying out with me. Many may recall Pete from his Guide work in the first half of the Boston Marathon this year. This time he gets to cross a finish line with me!

There’s no doubt Kilimanjaro and my Achilles impacted my run training, but I did make a late push and think I’ll be improving significantly on last year’s finish time. While I placed first in B1 last year, there are several new runners and even a few international competitors who will be running under the 4-hour mark to push me to be at my best. I’m hoping to be under 3 hours and 45 minutes if all goes well.

For those wishing to follow me, our 2020 Vision Quest website and social media will hopefully be sharing ways to get updates and providing them as best possible. I’ll be using Runkeeper and broadcasting my run live through that application. With the race starting at Folsom Prison at 7 am PST, I’m hopeful to be finished by 11 am pst. I’ll be staying for the awards ceremony to celebrate all the victors and whether I place or not I know I’ll give my very best and bring home another collection of experiences to share.

So let’s wish for good running weather and many healthy and happy participants who will have won a much more important race when they all chose to believe in the celebration of “Ability Awareness” first and foremost!

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21 Nov 15

By Randy Pierce

Randy, Tracy, and Autumn sitting on a mountain

Thanks from Randy, Tracy, Autumn, and 2020 Vision Quest!

I believe that the active demonstration of thankfulness is more valuable than just the expressing of thankfulness. However, they go together — while I certainly hope and strive to commonly demonstrate my appreciation for the many people (and pups!) who help me achieve a valuable, meaningful, and generally very enjoyable life, I believe it’s important to publicly express it too. So I would like to say thank you to a most excellent community of friends!

On behalf of the 2020 Vision Quest, I think it’s important to talk about some of the powerful realities brought about by the community of support given to our charity efforts. At our recent and very successful Sixth Annual Peak Potential Dinner and Auction, I told the room some of the highlights of our mission. We have now spoken to more than 45,000 students in schools throughout New England mostly. The litany of positive testimonials on the students, teachers, and administrators is all the thanks I would ever need to continue my earnest work and it is your community of support and encouragement which has helped us to realize that potential and to create a vision of reaching so many more in the years ahead.

Both NHAB and Guiding Eyes have confirmed their appreciation for the donations we’ve given over the last five years – an incredible amount totaling  $164,440. This fantastic financial contribution to those worthy organizations helps ensure that crucial services are available to many visually impaired people.

We do all this with a team of individuals who give freely of their time and efforts to ensure we continue to reach the primary mission of inspiring people to achieve their own versions of peak potential personally, professionally, and philanthropically. I do not know how many lives have been positively impacted by the work of 2020 Vision Quest, but I’m extremely confident it is many thousands of people at this point to match the many thousands of dollars donated.

So one more time for this Thanksgiving week, let me thank all of you reading this and many more who sadly may not know the full measure of my appreciation but deserve it nonetheless. You are an incredible team and I’m both proud and grateful for the peaks we are reaching together. Thank you all!

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16 Nov 15

By Michelle Russell

What an amazing Event!

Last night I attended my fourth Peak Potential Dinner and Charity Auction (the sixth one they’ve held). As I reflect on the night one word comes to mind:

GIVE….

G ~ Guiding Eyes for the Blind

A golden lab puppy named Honey meets Autumn

Future Guide Dog Honey meets Autumn!

The event was attended by 24 puppy raisers from NH, ME and MA and 6 puppies in training  (3 black Labs and 3 yellow Labs).

The hit of the party was 8-week-old yellow Lab “Honey” that was carried around and loved by all.  This event is a special night for the puppy raisers. It is a chance to socialize with each other while supporting a cause that is at the core of each of us. This is to provide the gift of love and raise a puppy for approximately 14 months and then give it back to Guiding Eyes for the Blind. This priceless gift – a Guide Dog will provide a person with vision loss, not only independence and mobility but also companionship.

Guiding Eyes for the Blind receives check

Guiding Eyes for the Blind receives check from 2020 Vision Quest

The dinner works as a wonderful training venue for our pups.  It allows the puppies to practice greeting people, settling at the tables with other dogs and practicing good house manners while food is being served. We each appreciate the chance to be welcomed with our pups by all of those attending the event.

Pat Weber, the Regional Manager for Guiding Eyes for the Blind, and Bill LeBlanc, the NH Region Coordinator, accepted a check from 2020 Vision Quest of $20,200 for the non-profit Guiding Eyes for the Blind.

A second check for $20,200 was given to the NH Association of the Blind.

I ~ Inspiration

NH Association for the Blind receives a check from 2020 Vision Quest.

NH Association for the Blind receives a check from 2020 Vision Quest.

The culmination of the dinner is getting the chance to hear Randy Pierce speak.  The slideshow that accompanied Randy’s talk reviewed some of his amazing accomplishments as a blind athlete this past year: running the Boston Marathon and the National Championship, being the first blind athlete to compete in the Tough Mudder in LA, watching the amazing video and then Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa. Throughout the slideshow Randy mentioned his beloved Guide Dog Quinn who passed away from cancer a year and a half ago. His dedication and devotion to Quinn is evident as you hear Randy’s voice quiver at the mention of his unforgettable pup. All of the puppy raisers also learn by watching Randy’s Guide Dog Autumn working the event with Randy.  She is a beautiful black and tan Labrador retriever that Randy received from Guiding Eyes for the Blind.

The array of silent auction items.

The array of silent auction items to raise money for our worthy causes.

V ~ Vision

My take away “nugget” from Randy last night was this: “You do not need to have sight to have Vision.”

Randy has vision. He is a goal setter. We found out that in the next year, Randy plans on writing a book. It was fun watching Randy act as an auctioneer – one of the special auction items was to be emailed pages of the book he will be writing each month. The silent auctions were fabulous. It was fun to take my pup “Gary” and walk by all of the incredible silent auction items. What a great way to raise money for the 2020 Vision Quest charity.

E ~ Education  

Lively participation in our live auction.

Lively participation in our live auction.

One of the key missions of 2020 Vision Quest is to lead and inspire students and professionals to reach beyond adversity and achieve their “peak potential.” It is mind boggling to think that Randy and 2020 Vision Quest have spoken to 45,000 students. He recounted letters he has received from some of the schools. Just recently,  a student that attended one of Randy’s presentations was going to drop out of school — but decided not to because of the inspiration and impacting message that he received from Randy. He does this all while integrating life lessons into little stories that teach about overcoming obstacles by managing adversity.

By attending the Peak Potential Dinner and Charity Auction, I am able to support the organization that is so important to me – Guiding Eyes for the Blind – but I gain so much from Randy.  He inspires me to do more…. To push myself…..  To set Goals…. To have vision…  in both my personal life and in my career.

“To Believe and Achieve Through Goal Setting, Problem Solving, and Perseverance!”

Thank you, Randy… you GIVE .

Bio:

Barnaby and MichelleMichelle Russell, MBA, is a puppy raiser for Guiding Eyes for the Blind and a NH Region Volunteer.  She has raised 3 pups, currently one of the pups she raised – Black Labrador Retriever “Randy” is in NYC working as a bomb detection dog keeping us safe. The puppy that she is currently raising (pup #4) is 5-month-old black Lab “Gary” who attended the dinner. She is also a Realtor with Keller Williams Realty in Nashua, NH. Please visit her website.

If anyone is interested in becoming a puppy raiser for Guiding Eyes for the Blind or buying/selling a home in NH they can contact Michelle@NHselecthomes.com for more information.

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