Tag: 2020VQ



13 Nov 16

By Beth Foote

The Peak Potential Team thanks you for your support!

The Peak Potential Team thanks you for your support!

“And you were all there.”

That’s what Randy said on Saturday night during his remarks at 2020 Vision Quest’s 7th Annual Peak Potential Dinner and Charity Auction. He ran through the history of this amazing event–from its humble beginnings in 2010 with 65 people in the Manchester Derryfield Country Club, to last night when we packed 200+ into our massive ballroom in the Courtyard Marriott in Nashua. He told how, in our first year, we gave $2,020 each to Guiding Eyes for the Blind and New Hampshire Association for the Blind, and that now, 6 years later, we’ve been able to give $20,000 to each association each year for the last few years.

“And you were all there.”

In a lively ballroom full of friends and supporters, Randy shared some of his own journey. He shared triumphs: climbing all 48 4,000-foot peaks in a single winter, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, running two Boston Marathons. He also shared sorrows and hardships: the death of his father on the morning of the 2012 Peak Potential, the death of his beloved Guide Dog Quinn a little over a year later, and a resurgence of his mysterious medical condition over the last year that caused frequent blackout episodes. Randy took his audience through his personal highs and lows of the last few years, and came back to this statement:

“And you were all there.”

Both this event and 2020 Vision Quest have grown by leaps and bounds every year. At Peak Potential 2016, with our new expanded space and biggest auction yet, we are expected to have raised more money than any Peak Potential so far. 2020 Vision Quest has reached a total of 53,000 children in our school presentations, 10,000 just this year. We’ve now created the “2020 Visionary” award to honor those who embody the principles of 2020 Vision Quest, and presented it to our inaugural recipient Dr. John Dagianis. Dr. Dagianis’s quick diagnosis of Randy’s condition over a decade ago helped Randy save partial sight at the time, and he is also widely known for his skill, compassion, and humanitarianism.

But what keeps breathing life into our mission is the joy, friendship, and support of our community. Year after year, both at Peak Potential and in between, our community comes together to support us and each other. It’s because of you that we can keep making the difference that is so important to make.

Last night, Michelle Croteau, a teacher at the Adeline C. Marston School in Hampton, NH, gave a presentation about how important our mission was to her students. She said that 2020 Vision Quest shows that “turning a vision into a reality is possible if you just believe in yourself.”

Our mission to encourage people to achieve their dreams and to financially give back to Guiding Eyes and NHAB wouldn’t be possible without you. By believing in us and coming back, year after year, you’ve helped us turn the vision of this event and our charity into reality. Together, we’ve built something that’s amazing and meaningful. Together, we’ve helped make a difference to so many people who need it.

“And you were all there.”

So thank you, from the bottom of our hearts. We are humbled and honored by your presence and your support. We hope you’ll keep on coming! We can’t do it without you.

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17 Sep 16

By Randy Pierce

Autumn and Randy walking, but with LEGO robots!Stepping in front of the energized auditorium for the kick-off event of the FIRST LEGO League Animal Allies season, Autumn and I were excited for all the possibilities ahead. We were also lost, as our route to the podium had been a little blocked by standing room only and she had taken a rather creative route to get me to the front of the room. We did a little problem solving and made our way there with her managing the obstacles safely if not necessarily the way I might have chosen. There was a lesson right in our very approach to the podium and in our brief 15 minutes we needed to build on the excitement, highlight and connect to the core values of FIRST LEGO League, explain our connection to the project and robot challenge with just a hint of our own core messaging worked into the mix.

This might be a tall order if our core values didn’t align so well already, which speaks volumes to the successful aspects we experience. This is part of the reason sponsor BAE systems first coordinated to invite us to the event as well as having us included as a fundamental part of this year’s international experience. I must admit there was an extra bit of amusement in learning they had created a LEGO version of Autumn for their introductory video which can be found along with the full description of their organization’s approach which has become so successful around the world here. 

This year the emphasis is upon how humans and animals can improve the way we interact to make things better for each of us. The teamwork Autumn and I employ is exceedingly demonstrative of this and that is why we represent a project challenge as well as a robot table challenge component possibility.

FIRST LEGO League uses three approaches to the season of competition:

  • Core Values
  • The Project
  • The Robot Challenge

The project requires the team of students to research a problem, identify a solution, share their solution and present this process and result to a panel of judges. One suggestion made in their video involved the present Dog Guide harness and there are so many other avenues around service dogs or our 2020 Vision Quest which might qualify for such a project. I’ll be interested to see how creative the thousands of teams prove as they progress forward.

Meanwhile, I want to leave you as I left them with this notion of the seven core values. If they learn those core values they will likely perform better in the competition, but if they embrace them as a part of their approach to life, they will not only perform better in the competition, they will also likely find more success in life. The difference is in the investment to truly understand the reasons why each of those values is a benefit to us, our teams and the world around us.

This should be no surprise because most things in life which we deem worthwhile likely deserve more than paying minimal attention to perception rather than full investment. Perception matters, sometimes more than I wish, but the reality behind our approach will always carry a more lasting meaning for us and those with whom we ally. This is the true secret strength behind the bond I share with Autumn and all my Dog Guides and why we reach our “peak potential” so well together! It is why I was glad to partner a bit with first, BAE and FIRST LEGO League because we hope these messages will help guide students to take tomorrow to better and better places.

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11 Sep 16

By Randy Pierce

Your Table is Ready! Join us for Peak Potential 2016.

A leader’s job is not to do the work for others, it’s to help others figure out how to do it themselves, to get things done, and to succeed beyond what they thought possible.
- Simon Sinek

Our Seventh Annual Peak Potential Charity Dinner and Auction is November 12. Although you can buy your tickets up until November 1, we set our personal goal this year to sell out by October 12, a month before the event. We urge you to help us reach this goal!

We accomplish many great things with 2020 Vision Quest’s yearly efforts. Each year’s success is largely based upon the support we receive from you and through your efforts on our behalf. Our team of volunteers, myself included, dedicate much time and effort because we believe in what we are able to achieve with your help and we make every effort possible to be worthy of your support. As the quote above suggests, we believe our school presentations help demonstrate a leadership of hard working, positive-minded achievers, while the organizations we support fiscally provide training and partners to strive further than many thought possible.

Peak Potential is a night to celebrate! We are well on the way to our goals of sponsors and ticket sales but we are not there yet. Help us share our goal of a sell-out–and better still, help us reach this goal by becoming part of our team right now.

We certainly have much to celebrate and more importantly we have so much more we can accomplish with your choice to be part of our team. I know some of you live far away (though there’s always the option to stay at the hotel that evening, as I’m doing). I know for some of you this isn’t the right opportunity and I appreciate the encouragement you share in other ways. I also know that we are over 2/3 of the way to a sell-out and already at numbers that would have sold out all our prior smaller venues. But I have a goal to share the evening with a full room of friends and supporters who will make this year our most successful event, and I’m asking you to help make this possible.

Please take a moment to invite a friend or two, buy a table or a ticket, consider a sponsorship, or consider an item for the auction donation. I have been fortunate to hear from so many how much our mission matters. For many, you won’t have to look far to find the same reports because it is likely we have had a positive impact in the life of someone you know. Come to the event and you will get to understand this and more firsthand.

Join me in spending an evening with a community of outstanding people who want to help others reach for the highest peaks and who provide support for the deepest valleys.

Come to Peak Potential!

 

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11 Jun 16

By Randy Pierce

Randy speaks in front of the McGreal centerSeveral hundred people descended upon the McGreal Sight Center for the NH Association for the Blind’s 13th annual Walk for Sight on Saturday, June 5, 2016. 2020 Vision Quest was represented by a team of 20 walkers who raised over our goal of $2,020 for the event.

One highlight this year was NHAB’s “Walk in My Shoes” program. Several fully sighted walkers chose to work with a Mobility Trainer from the Association to experience what it is like to travel with sight impairment. A little instruction and the use of sight simulators for glaucoma, macular degeneration, and several other common sight disorders, including a blindfold for the fully blind experience, enabled these walkers to truly understand some of the challenges faced by those served regularly by NHAB.

"Walk in My Shoes" - sighted people guiding people with blindfolds to mimic the experience of blindness.Since our team had a collection of children on the team, they wanted to experience a form of this and with their parents helped it to take place. I was able to walk amidst them with Autumn guiding me. Listening to their excitement and observations made me appreciate the enthusiasm of youth as well as their candor. Our version only involved closing their eyes so we didn’t get the sight restriction from them, but I did hear from several that trying to use limited sight was almost more strain in concentration.

For us the first and most common concept for them to experience was the trust in their sighted guide. It wasn’t reasonable to have them train for cane or dog but sighted guide is a common method for a sighted person to help with simple guidelines (no pun intended) to lead them along our city route amongst the crowd of fellow walkers. All seemed to become very aware of the ground on which they walked which they formerly took for granted. Each crack in the sidewalk, curb, sewer grate and even patch of sand became a little more noticeable for the potential hazard it represented.

While I expect at 6’4″ of height I may need to duck at times, it was surprising how many shrubs had our shorter team members ducking – even Tracy at her towering 4’11″ (and ¾”!!).

A final observation which I find quite true but was surprised to have noted by one of our youths was how much their awareness shrank to a smaller group than they were used to. Eyes allow you to understand what’s happening at a distance and in the noisy environment the world reduced to just a couple of close-by people and the concentration to manage the terrain.

The day was beautiful with many laughs as we relaxed together to celebrate helping a good cause while spending time together. I hope that next year we again assemble an even larger team to either experience a little walk in my shoes or help us support both our charity, 2020 Vision Quest, and the New Hampshire Association for the Blind! Thank you again to all those who joined us, all our many donators and especially to those who delved a little deeper this year!

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17 Apr 16

By Randy Pierce

Randy and Autumn walk on the sidewalk.As Patriots Day arrives with my making a slightly different attempt to savor the 120th running of the Boston Marathon, I took a little break from our usual blog. Instead, I invite you to visit the New Hampshire Association for the Blind who have recently launched their own blog and include an interview with me for their “Walk In My Shoes” opportunity at the June 4 Walk for Sight.

From the NHAB:

#WalkInMyShoes is a special feature on a portion of our annual Walk for Sight route that allows adult walkers the opportunity to take their fundraising involvement a step further and look at vision loss differently. For the first time ever, twenty participants can sign up for the #WalkInMyShoes awareness component. This feature will let them experience what it’s like to be on Main Street as a visually impaired pedestrian, by using blindfolds and simulation glasses, with the help of trained sighted guides.”

We encourage you to read their interview with me and perhaps take the challenge yourself. We certainly welcome you to join our team or sponsor someone on our team.

Read my full interview with NHAB here.

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2 Apr 16

Peak Potential 2016

By Randy Pierce

Our 7th Annual Peak Potential Charity Dinner and Auction is the pivotal event for our entire year. We have moved to the Courtyard Marriott in Nashua, our largest and finest venue ever, and with this move we invite you to join us as attendees, sponsors, donors–and especially, we invite you to help share this announcement as far and wide as possible.

When: November 12, 2016, 6:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Where: Courtyard by Marriott in Nashua NH

The Peak Potential website is live and contains everything you need to know for the event! Buy your tickets and help us work towards another sell-out which always helps us support our sponsorship and donation efforts. To help promote the earlier sales, we offer our best value with a table of 8 for $500 for a limited time. So please gather your friends and arrange to be part of an excellent evening essential to our mission. As always, tickets for couples and singles are available. 

“Why” is perhaps the most powerful question and I hope most of our community already well appreciates the reasons based on years of sell-outs and tremendous support. Our core mission has only grown more powerful as our school presentations continue to positively change the lives of the students, teachers and administrators. Our outreach is beyond 50,000 students just within schools and thousands more in outside programs. Our inspirational outreach has spread throughout New England and across the country, and there is so much more possible with your support.

A golden lab puppy named Honey meets Autumn

Future Guide Dog Honey meets Autumn at Peak Potential 2015.

Our all-volunteer staff continues to help us achieve incredible peaks of success which all begins with the support you give to this event. The essential financial donations we make to Guiding Eyes for the Blind and the New Hampshire Association for the Blind assure that services which transformed my life continue to be available for many others like me. Last year we gave each organization a check for $20,000 right there at the 6th Annual Peak Potential and we hope to continue such success. So please consider joining us immediately!

Attend the event! This venue has more space and tables than we’ve ever had and yet I still have a hope we might not only sell-out again but do so sooner than ever before. Each advanced ticket sale helps show to our sponsors, donors, team, and community how significant a response they will get from this great event.

Sponsorships are also available. You can be a primary contributor to the event! When I think of all the many organizations we’ve helped, I’m always reminded of the primary partners from our Platinum sponsors through our Friends of 2020 Vision Quest who support this event so well. Suggest us to your company or work with us and we’ll reach out to them.

The array of silent auction items.

The array of silent auction items to raise money for our worthy causes.

Auction item donations are a vital component for our silent auction and the five marquee live auction items we typically provide. We have begun to learn what items best resonate with our guests and hope you might consider what contribution might boost our event to even higher success.

Sharing the vision. We outreach as well as we are able, but full success comes from our community choosing to share the invitation and possible ways of contributing with their friends, family and beyond. Please do consider every reasonable means of outreach you can help us achieve or reach out to us and we’ll help you. Making this the most successful event ever will help us continue to make the incredible positive impact, which is at the core of our mission.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. I hope you get involved! I believe in what we do so much that I put my heart and soul into this effort. I’ve had a tough year amidst the tremendous success and so many are helping us continue to thrive and strive forward. I personally implore you to take a look at all we are accomplishing and I think that will motivate you to be involved. This is what I need and what our Peak Potential event needs starting right now!

Thank you for your time, past support and for joining me on the path to the 7th Annual Peak Potential Charity Dinner and Auction! 

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27 Mar 16

By Randy Pierce

“You get out what you put in!” – Oberto Beef Jerky slogan

Caught in the frustration and setback of my health challenges is hard. Even knowing this is the one-year anniversary of the Tough Mudder Los Angeles made famous by the Oberto Heroes of Summer video, it’s still easy for me to struggle amidst the present obstacles.

This past week was particularly challenging as more of the “deep brain seizures” took place along with some other neurological deteriorations which may in part be due to a significant cold which returned in force and became bronchitis and pneumonia. I’m particularly susceptible to these due to a neurological problem with my throat which impacts my ability to keep my airway clear. The week was spent largely being sick and attending medical tests, treatments, or appointments. There was one exception and it’s the heart of this post.

On Thursday, March 23, I attended the South Derry Elementary school and spoke to roughly 250 students from grades K-5. My invitation was initially a braille letter from a blind 5th grader. Our message is designed for everyone of all abilities and all ages. I adjust the approach and some of the concepts for desired points of emphasis to the target audience though the core resonates for most who share the presentation with us. Despite this I feel a slightly deeper connection when sight impairment is involved.

This single visit was the sum total of my week’s work and due to schedule adjustments it fell just short of a number goal I was hoping to share with all of you. With this visit we have presented to roughly 49,950 students just in schools. I had hoped to celebrate the announcement of 50,000 students and while we are short of that goal for the present moment, I cannot help being simply proud of how many young lives we have impacted so positively.

In that pride and appreciation is also the reminder of how much it helped my own spirits to feel I was contributing to the world in a meaningful way. Certainly I do know this but knowing isn’t always enough. In our most challenging moments, what we feel is more powerful than what we know. I needed the rest and recovery time tremendously this week and yet for me the best recovery derives from the feelings that visit gave to me.

I look forward to our future announcement of reaching more students and significant benchmarks. Most of all I look forward to working forward through the obstacles, surging past the setbacks, and getting my medical challenges sufficiently under control that my vision for where we are going remains as positive and clear of focus as the 2020 Vision Quest deserves. In the meanwhile a special thank-you to the team of volunteers who have kept things going and allowing me to step back for the short term goal. I hope to share some of their accomplishments on that end with next week’s blog but if you visit our homepage you’ll see some of the signs of that work!

Group shot at the LA Tough Mudder

On the one-year anniversary of this Tough Mudder, Randy still gets by with a little help from his friends.

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27 Feb 16

By Rick Stevenson

This seems a fitting time for us to re-issue a 2020 guest blog post originally published two years ago on the topic of “access”–in the sense of having a level playing field so that all people, whatever their challenges or disabilities might be, are able to participate in activities they love.

Massachusetts-based non-profit Waypoint Adventure shares 2020 Vision Quest’s commitment to helping people overcome and/or work around disabilities. They are holding their annual spring fundraising party this Friday evening, March 4th in Cambridge, and Randy is the keynote speaker!

Why not come out and enjoy a chance to hear one of Randy’s keynote presentations while meeting many great people and learning about a worthy organization? Learn more and register here.

Read below a post from March 2014 about how Waypoint works in communities to create and improve access for youth and adults with disabilities.

By Rick Stevenson

Access: (n.) - the ability, right, or permission to approach, enter, speak with, or use; admittance. (www.dictionary.com)

For our friends all around us with various disabilities, it’s all about access. It can be about other factors too, of course, but access is often a huge issue. Access to some things can be relatively simple: a home or office… a database… a person’s attention… property. But how about a mountain trail… a pristine forest near your home… a wall at a climbing gym… a glassy-calm river in summer? Are these easy for all to gain access? Unfortunately, no, not yet. That’s not as simple as adding a new wheelchair ramp or railings, but people and organizations are out there making progress.

Front L to R: Tim and Dew, in sleeping bags and on “sit-skis,” on the way down the   Tuckerman Ravine Trail with the rest of the team (Rick, Jim, Joel, Dan, Julia, Adam).

Front L to R: Tim and Dew, in sleeping bags and on “sit-skis,” on the way down the Tuckerman Ravine Trail with the rest of the team (Rick, Jim, Joel, Dan, Julia, Adam).

Over the past few weeks I’ve had the privilege to be involved in two events offered by Waypoint Adventure, an eastern Massachusetts-based non-profit organization that provides life-transforming outdoor adventure programs for people with disabilities. One event was a weekend in February at Pinkham Notch, NH (at the base of Mount Washington) when eight of us ascended the Tuckerman Ravine trail toward the floor of the huge bowl. Two of the group had cerebral palsy and rode up in “sit-skis”—modified lightweight chairs mounted on pairs of cross-country skis, with ropes and bars for pulling and restraining. With an afternoon temperature of around 15 degrees F and the wind from the west howling down the trail at us, the trip up and down the famous trail was adrenaline-pumping, hard work, exhilarating and full of joy for all eight participants. Trust was critical, especially on the descent—when anything less than excellent execution would have meant too much risk—and teamwork and communication were superb.

Tim Kunzier tries out the adaptive climbing harness at the Central Rock Gym.

Tim Kunzier tries out the adaptive climbing harness at the Central Rock Gym.

The second event was a Volunteer Appreciation Night held at the Central Rock Climbing Gym in Watertown MA, at which Randy Pierce was guest speaker. About 50 current and/or future Waypoint volunteers packed a room at the gym for a great meal, brief presentations about Waypoint, and expressions of appreciation, as well as Randy’s keynote about ability awareness, goals, and how important an engaged, enthusiastic community is to a volunteer-based organization. Afterward, attendees had a chance to try out the walls of the gym and/or take a certification class in belaying.

Waypoint’s mission is to “…help youth and adults with disabilities discover their purpose, talents, and strengths through the transforming power of adventure.” They believe that all people, regardless of ability, should “…have opportunities for adventure and through them realize their personal value, strengths and abilities. These experiences will help people become stronger individuals and community members.”

Access is, almost literally, about leveling a playing field. It’s also, thankfully, about pushing the envelope of what was previously thought to be impossible, so that people of all ages with disabilities can keep having new, exciting, stimulating experiences. Problem-solving. Creative thinking. Often that’s all that stands between a person with a physical disability and a challenging, thrilling, life-changing adventure, and here’s where some of the similarities between Waypoint Adventure and 2020 Vision Quest become most obvious.

Randy Pierce, as an adventurer who happens to be blind, has a need and a strong desire for access. Access to mountain trails, road races, ski slopes, a martial arts gym, a tandem bike. He’s solving challenges every day of his life, either in teamwork with his guide dog or human guide or on his own; whether training for a road race, hiking a trail, getting around his house or around Nashua, or running 2020 Vision Quest. And in turn, one of 2020 Vision Quest’s many value-adds is helping other vision-impaired people gain access–to whatever is most special in their lives.

Then there’s Waypoint Adventure, the creator of the two events mentioned above and pictured here. Run by co-founders Adam Combs and Dan Minnich and program coordinator Julia Spruance, (one of whom, I’m proud to say, is my daughter, but I won’t reveal which one), they not only create adventure programs but also invent and fine-tune unique “access methods” that allow individuals with disabilities to enjoy many of the same adventures as others. Methods and tools like the “sit-ski” (photo above left), an off-road wheelchair, an adaptive kayak, or an adaptive rock-climbing harness. You could say they’re in the access-creation field.

A final story that helps define and illustrate access: at a 2013 indoor climbing gym event run by Waypoint for teenagers from the Perkins School for the Blind, one of the boys, after some training and a few exhilarating trips up and down the wall, asked a Waypoint volunteer if she worked at the gym.  Hearing that no, she was with Waypoint and this was a gym open to the public, he asked, “So is this a gym for blind people?” The volunteer explained that no, there were sighted people there too. Final question: “Then am I climbing on a special wall?” Upon hearing her final answer, that “…no, you’ve been climbing on the same walls as everyone else,” he lit up with a wide grin. His biggest thrill of the day—perhaps the week or month—was realizing that he had been climbing on the very same walls as everyone else.  There’s that access again. Behold and marvel at the difference it can make!

Learn more about Waypoint Adventure.

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13 Feb 16

Randy shouting from the mountaintop

The countdown is finally done and we’re shouting our news from the mountaintops!

By Randy Pierce

“I am only one,
But still I am one.
I cannot do everything,
But still I can do something;
And because I cannot do everything,
I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.”

Reverend Edward Hale

I wanted a short and powerful blog this week. I wanted to record a one minute video from atop Sugarloaf Mountain where I was attending the New England Visually Impaired Ski Festival. I was unable to achieve my goal, and yet the news is something powerful and wonderful that I do indeed want to shout from the mountain tops:

We have been granted our *independent* 501(c)(3) status!!

We have been an approved and official 501(c)(3) organization since our inception due to NHAB choosing to fiscally sponsor our charitable efforts. Thanks to an incredible amount of hard work by many volunteers and you, our incredible community, we achieved the enough success that we were required to apply for our independent status. This was granted as a sign of confidence and achievement for which I am incredibly proud.

This changes nothing about our mission or our approach and we hope similarly nothing about the support which has allowed us to reach so many goals. As such I’m also using this announcement as a Call to Action: What choice, great or small, can you make to help our cause?

As we close in on providing presentations to our 50,000 students just within schools and a quarter of a million dollars to the two beloved organizations to whom we pledge our support, and as we continue to provide inspiration, encouragement, and support for an ever growing number of people–will you make a choice to help?

Will you make a donation? 

Will you book a keynote or suggest us to  a company or conference?

Will you refer us to a school teacher or administrator?

Will you connect to us on Social Media or share our links with your contacts?

Would you suggest to us ways you think we might enhance our efforts and achievements? Email me!

I hope you will answer this call to action and I hope we continue to be worthy of the confidence and support we have shared over our first five years. I may not be literally shouting it from a mountain top but I think this news and your choice are both significant and necessary. Thank you!

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2 Jan 16

By Randy Pierce

Randy signs a book

Possible future book signing?

Those in attendance at our Sixth Annual Peak Potential Dinner and Auction in November were afforded a very limited opportunity to be an integral part of the experience ahead. For those not in attendance, we want to now invite you enjoy a part of that experience. We have created a private and secure website where each month throughout this year I’ll upload a portion of my writings intended for the book. This will allow for all those participating to have an advanced reading of all the sections under consideration for the final product well in advance of that book release. You’ll also have insight into sections which while very pertinent to me may not make the final entry into the book. As such you’ll have a more complete and full experience than those who ultimately receive the final version of the book which we anticipate releasing next year.

How does this become possible for you? For a donation of $55 to 2020 Vision Quest, you may have your email added to the list receiving the monthly release of my writings to our secure site. You’ll be able to visit that site at your convenience and review not only that month’s release but the entire year’s uploads. This is a great means for you to help support the incredible work of 2020 Vision Quest while proving yourself with a very rare and special gift into my newest and perhaps most epic quest of all.

Randy and quinn on Mt. Monroe.

Randy and quinn on Mt. Monroe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit this page to make your donation and join us for this experience.

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