Outreach



30 Sep 18

By Randy Pierce

Man with support ropes over the side of a building If you have kept score you might have noticed we missed a pair of blogs here at 2020 Vision Quest’s “On The Path” outreach to our community. If you are wondering who is responsible for such things, look no further than me as that’s one of my duties. I’m a little disappointed but I have to tell you the “To Do” list piled up a little more than normal and I had to make some decisions in the priority. Today I get to share both my response to the feeling of being overwhelmed and some of the rather fantastic reasons behind it all.

I do not always respond ideally to feeling like I’m on the edge. This rather fun photo from the United Way “United Over the Edge” event last June highlights one positive response to a physical moment. In life moments I feel the stresses and pressure of a schedule occasionally a bit out of control. For me a list and a priority plan are quality tools but the best tool of all is to share how I’m feeling to inspire a little collaboration on the plan for managing. Essential in that process is to understand frustration leads faster to failure and curiosity creates calm. The quicker I convert frustration to curiosity, the quicker I’m on the path to resolution.

As for what has been building the backlog, I won’t be able to share everything but a few very worthy highlights:

  1. Schools are at the heart of our mission and we are back at schools presenting with reviews already suggesting we are on the right path!
  2. Did I mention we have this enormous book launch incredibly close to happening? You might even expect the big news in next week’s blog on official dates, blurbs and more!
  3. Our 2020 Vision Quest website has been in the midst of a massive redesign and will launch on Wednesday of this week! We are excited to share the many aspects of it we feel will allow it to help us further our mission.
  4. Most of you know I dislocated my ankle badly last November and ultimately dashed my National Marathon Championship hopes. I’m hard at work training to be ready for the December 2 return with Rodney Andre guiding me to the best performance I can provide.
  5. Finally, we are less than 48 days away from our 9th Annual Peak Potential Event. While we are sold-out (Thank you!) and have tremendous sponsorship support, we are still working on the Auction details and ensuring it’s an event worthy of all those who put their trust in us for that very goal!

I hope you’ll forgive the two week hiatus and join us in celebrating the handful of exciting details above as well as the very big news coming next week.

 

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9 Sep 18

The team with the Rainbow Mountain Range behind them.

The team with the Rainbow Mountain Range behind them.

By Randy Pierce

Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.”
– Andrew Carnegie

So much of my life has benefitted from the incredible people with whom I have partnered along the path. In this book project, I’ve had partnerships aplenty. Even in the writing I was not alone as Tracy and I have been in this together, poring over every chapter, page, line and word to craft what we believe is a quality result. My friend Gene has been the editor — not just for the grammatical errors, of which there were many notable issues, but also for some excellent content guidance. My first and full test reader, Chris Woods, knows me well enough to share candidly even on some of the difficult topics: what works, what didn’t work, what needs more, and what needs to go away. Greg Neault has agreed to create the cover design for us and we are well on the way to finishing that process. Many more friends have had roles of encouragement and support bringing us to the effectively finished product of this book: See You at The Summit – My Journey From The Depths Of Loss To The Heights Of Achievement.

Now I’m asking for some of you to consider joining a new team with me. We are set to publish and have the process reasonably well in hand. I think most already know but for clarity, we are going to donate all of the proceeds at this point to 2020 Vision Quest and that increases our desire to help this be an excellent success.

We have chosen to manage all the promotion and events geared towards making this the best success possible. When do we reveal the cover and how? Where and when might I appear for book signings? How do we create the network of readers and enthusiasts who hopefully help us share a book we think has value to the world? This means I’ll need to convince you of its value as well and that’s no forgone conclusion on my part.

The more places we can think to reach out and connect to build excitement and connectivity for the book and its impending release, the better a success we may find for us and the 2020 Vision Quest charity. We believe the launch will officially happen on November 17 at our 9th Annual Peak Potential Dinner and Auction. This means I need to quickly get to work on all the best planning and approaches and it starts with this core team. Initially we need brainstorming and eventually we’ll need to be reaching out and contacting opportunities for signings, interviews and general promotion.

If you wish to help us on this big project, reach out to me with questions, comments or simply your suggestion you want to help and I’ll make a list. My intent is to communicate with an occasional conference call, some form of electronic connection such as an email list and very rarely, if ever, a live get-together. Some of us may meet at times if convenience encourages but people near and far may contribute and I’m eager to get started. My first outreach will happen on September 15 to the entire team at that point. We’ll have only two months until launch and so need every bit of that time.

So what do you think? Want to be part of this next team?

 

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2 Sep 18

By Randy Pierce

Randy sitting, giving a presentation at Newmarket School, 2013.What is behind our educational presentations at schools throughout New England? We are told many times and in various ways that the most important part may be that inspired students and staff are often more motivated to believe in themselves, set goals, manage obstacles, face adversity, utilize problem solving, enhance perseverance, and many more positive methods of managing life as a result of our time together. This is no doubt part of why so many schools invite us to return regularly to speak with students year after year. It is also why we are inspired to give our best effort to connect with more students and schools.

But in order to accomplish this, we need your help.

We rely on those who are familiar with our presentations to share the opportunity with teachers, administrators, PTA organizations, or simply anyone connected with the process by which a school might consider bringing us to visit. We are launching a new website very soon but the links will remain constant and the basic process is well defined such that simply sharing the link with a word of encouragement might be all it takes to provide the opportunity. We suggest our For Educators page.

Sharing our site accomplishes a significant part of the need in helping more people become aware of the opportunity we provide. A second and equally important need involves the many volunteers who help Autumn and me arrive at our destination for these presentations.

Randy presents in a school auditorium with many children. We keep a private Facebook page for 2020 Vision Quest Volunteers in which I post each opportunity and allow the approved drivers to choose if they are available. I would welcome as many of you as are able to consider joining the group to enhance the possibility of those rides being available to make the school visits possible.

There are many people who have kindly put themselves on the list, but with so many visits throughout the year, we are often in need of more volunteers to manage the diverse timing and locations of these opportunities. I also keep a (presently short) list of email contacts in the event the one post to our Facebook list fails. It is worth mentioning my friend Rick Pereira has chosen to be a fail-safe plan and thus has accompanied me to more school presentations than anyone else through the years. Without his invaluable service, our ability to deliver our presentations would be significantly more challenged.

There are several people who have been tremendously supportive in this fashion and if you are unable to join the Facebook group but would be willing to join my list for emergency outreach, please drop me an email and let me know how I might reach out to you in such a situation.

Ultimately, we are confident in the benefit of our presentations and will continue to strive to ensure we provide a positive enhancement to the students and schools as we have done  since our inception. As we work towards our peak potential in helping more, we always celebrate the value of team–Together Everyone Achieves More. With your help, we can powerfully realize that and work towards an excellent year ahead. I hope you’ll join us in some fashion, including helping us boost the signal by sharing this post as widely as possible.

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4 Aug 18

By Randy Pierce

Are you missing out on Tracy, Autumn and my trip to Scotland presently? We are delighting in our vacation at the moment, so to make amends we want to invite you to join us for an exciting opportunity. On September 14 we intend to attend the showing of the “dogumentary” “Pick of the Litter” at the Kendall Square Cinema in Cambridge, MA.

It is easy to marvel and appreciate the incredible work done by all of my Guide dogs from Ostend to Quinn to Ms. Autumn. Many times I’ve been asked for more insight into just how this is all possible and now you can get a look into the process like never before. 2020 Vision Quest is proud to support Guide Dogs for the Blind, as they lent a paw to the process of this film we want to share with you.

So save the date and come join us on September 14!

Below you can see the recent press release about this from Guide Dogs for the Blind:

After several years in the making, we are excited to announce that Guide Dogs for the Blind is the subject of an award-winning, feature-length documentary that is coming to theaters across the country at the end of August. The film, titled “Pick of the Litter,” follows a litter of GDB puppies on their journey to becoming guide dogs. The filmmakers, Dana Nachman and Don Hardy, received unprecedented access to raisers, staff, and clients in order to create this look at our life-changing mission. We hope you’ll go check it out!

More information and the trailer for the film can be found at guidedogs.com/pickofthelitter.
Headline reads: Pick of the Litter, a service dogumentary. Under the headline is an image of five guide dog puppies sitting squished together. The yellow Lab on the end has a green puppy coat on. Other pups have red or green collars. Below the puppies is red text: Opening in Theaters followed by dates and locations. FYI, all dates and locations can be found on guidedogs.com/pickofthelitter.

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9 Jun 18

By Randy Pierce

A group of hikers on a mountain summit with a partly cloudy sky behind them.I joined the students of this leadership and backpacking course in the spring of 2010 in preparation for my own hiking adventures and to provide an untypical aspect for those students. Those experiences and friendships left a significant imprint upon me and I continued to be involved in different ways through the years since then. This year Brent asked me to act as the TA for the class and we went through the appropriate approvals, hoping my many experiences in hiking, leadership, and communication would provide positive guidance in the classroom and along the trails.

Day 1: We set out on May 21 with my legs being a little weary from the Gate City Marathon the day before and my pack a little heavy as I was carrying Autumn’s sleeping bag and food along with all of my own supplies. The two student leaders of the day, Brian and Sam had provided us walkie-talkies to keep communications open in our two vehicles as we approached the trailhead for our first day’s hike into Wachipauka Pond.

Hikers with full packs walk on a rocky trail. As usual Autumn spent the first 100 yards being a little too enthusiastic and I had to mitigate her enthusiasm with my own enhanced caution as my right hand trekking pole work was emphasized. Quickly she settled into high quality trail work and I was very proud as on the hot day and steady climb she simply shined in work and obvious love for the wilderness. I spent the early part near the back with Brian behind me as sweeper, ensuring the group was together and ahead of him. As we began our first descent we switched to a little trail entertainment by partnering up, me with Caitlin, to talk about our day and trip goals with each other. It was a chance to begin building better connections and worked rather nicely. Ultimately as we reached a series of “bog bridges.” Autumn and I worked them tediously but Caitlin had the opportunity to help by becoming the first student to choose a little human guiding. She set the tone for many others later and we worked the short stretch of trail building the guide language for a comfortable pace and quality interaction.

In short order, our shortest day brought us to Wachipauka Pond. The temperatures were ideal, the scene as majestic as previous trips promised, and for a time we just relaxed and enjoyed the remote serenity earned by an afternoon of trail work together. My SteriPEN water purifier refused to light as the single downside of my evening preparations, but Brent and the team found ways to help Autumn and me have purified water for the trip. The leaders brought the team together and bear bags were hung, tarps for sleeping and cooking were established and an idyllic evening descended complete with one of the sunset gifts those who experience them in the White Mountains usually treasure for the rest of their days. We had a couple of meetings to close out our activity before sleeping open to the air with the sounds of the pond and the likely moose who traipsed belligerently within 50 yards of our campsite and left his marks for us to find in the morning.

Rocky trail with a blue sky behind it.Day 2: Samm and Anthony were our leaders. (This “Samm” was male, vs. the female “Sam” who led on day 1.) Anthony was taking a bonus leadership day to fill in for our first casualty as Chloe had an illness requiring her to miss the trip. We started out with a steady upward climb to the Webster Slide summit and a beautiful overlook, our first official “peak” of the trip. We did a little stretching as a group and had a lot more interactions amongst the team as both Bridget and Emma took some turns guiding me to supplement the great work being done by Autumn as well. Down is simply always easier with a human guide and there were some fun challenge points along this route. We made excellent time to cross a road and make a significant water crossing which included an educational moment for the various methods of safer water crossing. Autumn showcased multiple crossings until a stick enticement convinced her to go all the way over and be held there awaiting my cross.

There is a point in most hikes where conversations bring teams together and as the rain held off for us, the trail was generally gentle, we came together decently. Just to enhance the scenario of challenge, a “fake” broken arm practice was added to the leader challenge and still we arrived to the Jeffers Brook Shelter ahead of schedule and feeling strong despite the rain joining our group. Several of us made use of the shelter and had a few AT through and section hikers to enhance the evening conversations. The evening debrief was a supportive and encouraging preparation for what most expected to be our most challenging day.

Sign pointing to various trails including Glencliff Trail 0.9 milesDay 3: Bridget and Anthony had us up at 5 with light traces of the rain still falling. Brent was ill and that complicated the start, as did our plan to hike a short distance to a car spot where we would have breakfast and adjust some equipment for the remaining trip. This was more important, as Brent’s medical device had lost its charge and the back-up battery wasn’t working. As my water purification system had seemingly failed, Brent was my support and my cook partner so both of us became a delay for the group. At the car Brent charged his device, we repacked, and set out for the Glencliff trail and Mt. Moosilauke!

Because of the low water aspects, I had my heaviest water load, and below Glencliff the trail gets a little boulder-strewn. Due to this, after the steady steepness we reached a section of trail which was particularly hard work for Autumn and me. At this point I shared my struggle to keep the group pace and for a short time switched to Emma guiding me to bolster both of us for a bit. Then Samm took his first shift to handle the long steady steep up to and over the headwall of Moosilauke with us pushing well into the full hunger-almost-hangry range for the team. A well earned lunch below south peak recharged us for the glorious ridge walk which Autumn handled once again until we emerged in the boulder fields and alpine zone where Brent guided as we all managed an impressive 40 mph wind for our spectacular summit reward!

Our goal for the day was Beaver Brook Shelter and so a fair bit of hiking remained. The trail involved some particularly precarious sections and due to Brent’s overall health concerns, he needed to be free of guiding. The students realized Autumn and I would be slow on this track and so took the challenging load for a strenuous section concluding with a considerable amount of snow/monorail hiking led by Sam, working some impressive final descents to the much celebrated shelter. It was a very weary team debrief, proud of the accomplishments and having fully come together to work through all the challenges and fully understand the many ways of supporting each other. Our AT section hiker had made the journey with us and surprised some by sharing that in his 23 years of section hiking the Appalachian Trail, this was his hardest day ever.

Bright sunrise on Day 4 of the hike. Day 4: Our fourth and final day began with the most powerful sunrise of the trip. We faced out over the Kinsmans, the Lafayette ridge, and the presidentials beyond with the sun rising to give the layered mountains a particularly majestic splendor few will ever forget. Caitlin and Emma were our leaders of the day. Brent had experienced his roughest night and was resolutely tending himself to overcome a difficult start. It was crisp and cold at our 3800 feet of elevation and Autumn wisely chose to curl up with our AT companion as he was the last one in a sleeping bag once we had all packed and prepared for departure. We set out as quickly as possible to retrace some of our prior evening’s steps up before descending steadily down through an old forest. It was part of a long-ago Dartmouth ski trail from an era when skiing involved no turns other than what the trail made!

Some of the terrain was more difficult than anticipated and trail games had the group laughing and entertained while I was in full concentration. On a particularly rough trail, I rolled an ankle on a shifting rock more seriously than usual, which resulted in a rare fall for me. The mirth of the group would be essential as would Brent’s high focus guidance to ease my hobbling worked out the long miles still remaining. When the trail eased by our stream crossing and gentle footing allowed us to pick up pace and find the Ravine Lodge for reward, a weary but satisfied group had once again undergone the transformative process of such hikes.

Leadership, guidance, and the richly rewarding wilderness experience were certainly all part of the process. For Autumn and me, we had bonded well with the people of this trip and it was easy at times to forget the decades of difference in our ages because of the commonality of our experience. There is a sadness to the ending and knowing we will never have the same group together to experience all of the varied powerful moments we did share. There is, however, much reward in knowing we grew together, shared together and all of us, student, teacher, and Autumn extraordinaire experienced individual growth on our journey towards personal peaks. I’ll take the growth and the memories and the solace of knowing the choice to be on the path is the most rewarding one of all.

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13 May 18

By Randy Pierce

Bank of NH logoWe are thrilled to announce the Bank of New Hampshire returns to be our Platinum Sponsor for the 9th Annual Peak Potential Gala! Our newest team member, Carolina Tumminelli, is on board to help your sponsorship opportunity be Peak Potential worthy.

I asked Carolina to announce the great news of Bank of New Hampshire choosing to join us as the event sponsor once again while sharing a bit about her motivations for joining us. I interrupt her guest blog briefly to thank Bank of New Hampshire, Carolina, and all our potential future sponsorships for the choice to partner with the Peak potential team. I certainly love and value the work we do with 2020 Vision Quest and one of the many gifts are the interactive experiences of working with tremendous  partners and teams. T.E.A.M. – Together Everyone Achieves More.

Learn more about how to become a sponsor of Peak Potential. 

Guest Blog — by Carolina Tumminelli

2020 Vision Quest Poster with Quinn and Randy on a winter slope, with the words "Climb Your Mountain" superimposed. Bank of New Hampshire logo at the bottom.Preparations are underway for our 9th Annual Peak Potential Dinner, our largest fundraising event of the year. We are pleased and honored to announce that Bank of New Hampshire has once again agreed to be our Platinum Sponsor for the 8th year in a row!  Their support of our cause, as well as yours, allows us to support the 2020 Vision Quest mission of inspiring people to reach beyond adversity and achieve their highest goals.

Through 9 years of Peak Potential, the team has been able to grow a strong community to provide incredible support, and it is with the help of Bank of New Hampshire, we continue to do so into 2018.

I’m also pleased to announce that I’ve joined Randy and the team in helping coordinate sponsorships for Peak Potential 2018 so we can make it the best year yet. As a lawyer and small business owner, I bring a different viewpoint as to what might intrigue other business owners to sponsor and support Peak Potential.

I’m excited to have the opportunity to help Randy and 2020 Vision Quest promote Peak Potential, which I was able to attend last year. It was truly an inspirational evening full of laughter and fun! I’m excited to see what we make of it this year and again have another wonderful evening.

Carolina K. Tumminelli, Owner and Attorney of The Law Offices of Carolina K. Tumminelli PLLC

Visit my website
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6 May 18

By Randy Pierce

Autumn looking at the camera with big doggy eyes

Autumn wants you to support us in the Walk for Sight!

On Saturday, June 2, in Concord, NH we’ll all gather for a short 3k (1.8 miles) stroll together for the Walk for Sight.

If you join us, you can see some of the amazing work of Autumn guiding me, many other guide dogs and cane users, and several hundred supporters helping us raise awareness and funds for the more than 30,000 people we hope to provide training and service at Future In Sight. We’ll finish the walk and have lunch together, and somewhere in there our 2020 Vision Quest team will present will also present a check for nearly $30,000 raised through our tremendous community of support throughout the year.

We fund raise through three main methods: our Peak Potential Dinner in November, this walk, and my corporate presentations. This walk is a low cost way to join in, literally, or by a donation to one of our team members (pick me!), but time is running out so please consider making the choice today!

Less than a month to the event and our team has been growing slowly so we hope to make this push for a full team and for all our walkers to hopefully hit their fund raising goals.

See our previous blog on the Walk for Sight.

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3 Mar 18

By Randy Pierce

Randy and Alex, the team captain, in the Walk for Sight in June 2017

Randy and Alex, the 2017 team captain, in the Walk for Sight in June 2017. Look out for Tracy as the team captain for 2018!

“The miracle is not to walk on water. The miracle is to walk on the green earth, dwelling deeply in the present moment and feeling truly alive.”
-  Thich Nhat Hanh

On Saturday, June 2, 2018, I will celebrate walking at the 15th Annual Walk for Sight at 25 Walker Street, Concord, NH which is the home of Future In Sight. I will celebrate the thousands of lives uplifted by their life-changing training, services, and support — including my own!

What I hope to celebrate even more is the many people who will gather to walk the 3-kilometer route or otherwise support our ability to ensure thousands more in need will have the same opportunity. We can raise awareness, funds, and community connections by joining together to enjoy the late morning and early afternoon.

Will you join our team?

We have had so many commitments and activities for ourselves and our many friends that it has been more challenging to sustain our commitment to this wonderful event for the incredible 15 years. Yet the need persists and the organization’s commitment to improve it each year while elevating the incredible work they achieve has enhanced their worthiness for our efforts.

The 2020 Vision Quest team at Walk for Sight 2017!

The 2020 Vision Quest team at Walk for Sight 2017!

So Autumn and I implore you to consider joining our team and using the new website to help reach out for donations to support the 2020 Vision Quest effort as well as Future In Sight. We will be splitting our fundraising in a 50/50 program, assuming we meet our minimum fundraising requirements of $1,000 as a team. We have managed this each year since the program began and I can tell you that Autumn and I have made that amount our personal goal. If you cannot join our team — which is our absolute first preference — then please consider making a donation to our effort.

Donate to Randy and Autumn’s Walk Page!

The earlier you make the choice to join the team, the easier it will be to hopefully help raise a few sponsorships for your walking or general donations of support. So please consider one of my personal quotations: procrastinate procrastination! Join us today and we’ll keep you informed of all the ways we hope to keep the event and our team growing together towards our goals!

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7 Jan 18

By Randy Pierce

Randy Pierce standing at a podium presenting” …it rocked the entire audience of 130 people. There were farmers, lawyers, doctors, teachers, artists from young to old… Everyone felt that Randy was talking to them. It was a profound experience.” – Celeste Barr, Beaver Brook Association

I always strive to connect with people. It is perhaps one of the foundations of who I am and not surprisingly how I have been able to achieve. It is why Celeste’s kind words above inspired me. Through the evolution of 2020 Vision Quest, my keynote presentations to corporations and other organizations have developed into a fundamental part of our connection and the means by which we raise funds to do our charitable work. I appreciate the outstanding and often longstanding ovations received for the method and message in our keynote approach. I intend to keep building on the worthiness and expanding our outreach.

Anyone may schedule a presentation or learn more on our Keynote Presentation page.

What is the goal of my keynote presentation? While my experiences have equipped me with a foundation of prominent speaking points such as goal setting, managing adversity, teamwork, communication, managing failure, finding purpose, motivation, and more; the essence of them is my ability to customize each presentation towards the target audience.

The presentation has a highly relational conversational tone which most who attend find captivates their attention and broadens their vision. In order to do this, I typically will take the time to understand the objectives of the conference, meeting, or event to ensure the right anecdotes and themes are brought to the forefront. I encourage a positivity which is well grounded in understanding and embracing realistic challenges in a resilient, problem-solving mindset utilizing collaboration and communication to best affect.

These successful keynotes have enabled us to present across the country to hundreds of organizations. Whether a small business group or full corporate event, the testimonials continue to confirm that we meet and more often exceed the objectives professionally while providing an uplifting personal inspiration for those who join us.

As compensation for these keynote presentation, we request an honorarium to the 501(c)(3) charity, 2020 Vision Quest. With all the positive aspects involved in this opportunity, we again encourage you to consider scheduling us for your event or recommending us to someone you know in need of such a speaker for their event. We think you’ll join many people who believe it was one of the best decisions they made.

Schedule a presentation or learn more.

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2 Dec 17

By Randy Pierce

Peaceful snowy woods with trees and a field.I’m all too often aware of the many worthy causes which tug on all of our heart strings as we travel the paths along our journey. Sometimes the causes fill me with sadness and the empty feeling of being insufficiently able to help. Usually though, the very act of learning is because someone has guided me to the opportunity.

It was the night before our Peak Potential event as we were closing out preparations when two inspiring people made the first choice. Tom Cassetty is a friend who also coaches young athletes in running. That morning, the father of one of his young runners had unexpectedly died. We all scramble for how to respond in such dour times laced with well intentioned platitudes. Tom wanted to ensure the runners for the track meet the next mourning would have black arm bands to wear to memorialize the father and he needed someone who could sew them together for him late that night. My wife Tracy immediately volunteered and together they made it happen despite all the many reasons she could have understandably elected not to step forward.

I am so proud and appreciative of the kindness and caring in these two people for a simple step and still I felt and feel so concerned at the wife and eight children left behind by the sudden death of John Balletto.

John was their source of income through his business of moving and clean-out services Balletto & Sons in Hudson, NH. His wife Melanie intends to temporarily close the business to prepare for her ability to take over managing it going forward. Those changes will take a little bit of time and I hope that anyone in need of their services will consider reaching out to them as they re-open.

In the meantime, the holidays approach with many needs despite many caring people reaching out to help with their short term needs and if you, like me, are moved to help in any fashion; I wanted you to have access to their story and a place where you could donate.

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