Happy Anniversary, Autumn!

Autumn looks adorable at pumpkin time.
Autumn looks adorable at pumpkin time.

By Randy Pierce

“In daylights, in sunsets
In midnights, in cups of coffee
In inches, in miles, in laughter, in strife
In five hundred twenty five thousand six hundred minutes
How do you measure, a year in the life?”

From “Seasons of Love” – soundtrack to Rent

How indeed do I measure the year we’ve had and the gift of Autumn in my life? As the song lyric above suggests: “How about Love?” Autumn is absolutely about joy and love to her very Black and Tan core. For us the love came quickly and yet the depth to which it has grown as our partnership continues is truly the wonder of Autumn, our animal companions in general, and particularly the Guiding Eyes program. Each day of working with her she alters the freedom, independence, comfort and safety of my ability to travel and to interact with the world. She also shares her boundless joy and enthusiasm with a blend of playfulness and affection which is the essence of my beautiful girl.

Autumn grins on a sunny dock after a successful presentation.
Autumn grins on a sunny dock after a successful presentation.

Some may recall the 10-day training journal which we kept on the blog last year. It’s still an excellent resource for how the bond and training blend together to make a Guide team:

Autumn’s 10-day training journal

We’ve been together on school visits, city routes, park walks, mountain hikes, cars, buses, trains and planes. We’ve travelled all over the state and across the country together already. She’s been in the newspapers and on TV. She literally crossed the finish of my first marathon with me (on leash with Tracy as I ran with Guide Thor). On all of our journeys together, every step beside me I experienced the freedom and independence which I find is unrivaled in the world since my eyes ceased to guide me. We’ve come to understand each other very well and the maturing of our work, still growing and learning every day, has become very effective.

Yes, we each still make a few mistakes along the way. As in all of life we both are committed to the patience and understanding and desire to improve as a team which ensures our success will continue.

Autumn showers Randy with affection.
Such a loving girl.

She has embraced her “momma” Tracy with all the fun and love to fill a home. She has welcomed our full social circle and is building all of her own special friendships and relationships with people. Most of all, though, this lovely girl has joined in partnership with me to be my Dog Guide with her own unique style which fortunately for me begins by filling my life with joy and love.

I cannot measure all the moments or methods by which she improves my life. I could fill many an evening telling tales of our adventures and achievements. On this, our one-year anniversary of being matched I think it best just to share my thankfulness to guiding Eyes and to Autumn for the marvelous gifts of this year. Happy Anniversary, Autumn, and thank you for the full measure of love you bring to my life!

“No Home is complete without the pitter patter of dog feet.” – anonymous

Autumn lies on the ground eyeing a resting butterfly.
Happy anniversary, Autumn!
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“Right neighborly of ya” — Communities of support

By Randy Pierce

“People glorify all sorts of bravery except the bravery they might show on behalf of their nearest neighbors.”
— George Eliot

Ice and snow at the Pierce house after a recent storm.
Ice and snow at the Pierce house after a recent storm.

One of the most snow-laden winters on record is presently burying our little corner of the country. When there is this much snow, it becomes more challenging to clear driveways with banks over your heads. It also becomes more essential to clear roofs and do other work not common to the typical winter for us. People are tired and discouraged as more storms and more work continue to be a part of the routine.

Yet in the midst of this we find everyday heroes among us. For Tracy, Autumn, and me, this includes two separate but close families who live across the street. It is a rare snowstorm in which we don’t have one or both of them in our driveway with a snow blower–often without our knowing which one came to the rescue–simply because they are the helpful, caring, and kind people who so often find the motivation to do just a little more for others.

When I posted the above picture on my personal Facebook page recently, it was to capture the depth of snow and ice which was invading our home and to mark it before I began the process of clearing the ice and snow from the roofs – a project I would never finish as the neighbors descended in force and worked tirelessly with an invigorating good-humored laughter central to the work. I’ll spare their names for this public blog but suffice it to say they have earned our appreciation and tremendous thanks so many times over that the above quote fits so very well.

“Good fences make good neighbors.” – Robert Frost

While the New England poet’s words have garnered more fame than the heroic quote I opened the blog with, I think the fundamental part of New England community and strength is knowing when to come together in support. We may not raise a lot of barns together in this day and age, but our opportunities to positively influence those around us is simply tremendous. Learning to cross the lines all too often used to divide us is such a worthy approach. My friend Court Crandall took it a step further in his TEDx talk “Creating the Lines Which Unite Us”. I’m just thankful for the great people who choose to do heroic things great and small to show the positive power of community–people like our neighbors, and people like all of us if we so choose.

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“PAWSibility” – A school language lesson

By Randy Pierce

One of the most rewarding and impactful aspects of 2020 Vision Quest is our School Educational Program. On Tuesday, January 13, I had the pleasure of visiting the John F. Ryan and the Louse Davy Trahan Elementary Schools in Tewksbury, MA.  As I listened to the school announcements prior to our presentation at the Ryan School, I heard their PA announce, “Believe in PAWSibility – Woof” and knew our message was already resonating with these fifth and sixth grade students.

I was happy to share many messages with them including my own more backward A-B-C approach: “Conceive – Believe – Achieve.” Their insightful questions allowed us to cover many topics, with teamwork resonating perhaps strongest of all.

My afternoon in Tewksbury brought me to the Trahan school where a teacher’s request enabled us to showcase an Autumn-style language lesson. They wanted me to walk around the cafeteria in which we were presenting such that all of the students could get a quality look at how Harness Guide work is accomplished. This was a simple request, but in order to have Autumn walk in a loop around the entire room I needed to give Autumn a target destination. The only thing which stood out visually to the teacher was a window and I’d never taught Autumn the word window. She knows door, stair, elevator, car, left, right and many other words, but not window. So for these third and fourth graders, it was time to teach her.

This is done with a powerful teaching tool given to us by the Guiding Eyes for the Blind trainers. When I make my hand into a fist and say the word “Touch” she is trained to enthusiastically push her muzzle to my hand quickly. My job is to give her an immediate “Yes!” exaltation and follow it with a treat. By repeating this with my hand against an object I want her to learn, she begins to associate that object with what comes next.

In this case, “Touch window” was repeated with the muzzle nuzzle and reward. After a few times, the first remained but the word touch was removed such that window was now the direct association with the object. Presto! Suddenly Autumn had learned a new word, and when I said “Find the window,” she navigated me directly to it. When I said “Find my chair,” she returned me to the place from which we began. It was a wonderful lesson on my girl’s ever growing vocabulary and let the students see her enthusiasm for learning – something she has in common with many students at our school presentations.

We are proud to have presented to over 36,000 students since founding 2020 Vision Quest in 2010 and count on reaching many more! If you would like to learn more about our education program, please visit our school education page and/or reach out to us at education@2020visionquest.org.

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Days ahead and days of Auld Lang Syne

By Randy Pierce

Randy, Tracy, and Autumn wish you a happy year ahead from the Golden Gate Bridge.
Randy, Tracy, and Autumn wish you a happy year ahead from the Golden Gate Bridge.

AULD LANG SYNE (English Translation)

Should old acquaintance be forgot, and never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot, and days of long ago?

CHORUS:
For days of long ago, my dear, for days of long ago,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet, for days of long ago.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup! and surely I’ll buy mine!
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet, for days of long ago.

CHORUS

We two have run about the slopes, and picked the daisies fine;
But we’ve wandered many a weary foot, since days of long ago.

CHORUS

We two have paddled in the stream, from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared since days of long ago.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand my trusty friend! And give me a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll take a right good-will draught, for days of long ago.

CHORUS

For me, the heart of the New Year is not in the resolutions but in the reflections and looking ahead. My years are so very full of meaning and the pace often just a bit too unrelenting for the full measure of both of those things which surges to me around January’s arrival. I’ll take a short tour of the 2020 Vision Quest year past and thoughts of 2015 ahead.

Last January’s tragic loss of the Mighty Quinn resonates still for the loss and for the legacy he left behind. Our first published work is written from his perspective in Pet Tales and has been very well received. Our #Miles4Quinn has encouraged many thousands of healthy miles and both Randy and Tracy completed their first marathons in his honor.

Autumn arrived to ease some of the pain and bring her own joy and talents into our world. Her boundless joy continues to uplift our spirits every day as our bond and teamwork continues to grow.

We continued to experience mountain climbing although running goals were a primary feature. From our pioneer work on a Tuff Mudder to a B1 National Marathon Championship, there were many accomplishments. The NH Magazine “It List”, a TEDx Talk, and the strengthening of our board and staff all highlight a year of many positive strides. I think, as always, that the 34,000 students we’ve reached with our presentations remains one of the strongest aspects of our year and mission.

The promise we seek in 2015 is to bring out our best efforts and hopefully encourage and inspire others to do similarly. Winter training is leading towards readiness for the Boston Marathon. Summer’s training is towards the trip to Tanzania and our goal to reach our highest peak at the top of the world’s tallest stand alone mountain: Kilimanjaro!

Along the way we hope to bring our total students to well above 50,000 and continue our corporate presentations which may enable us to support Guiding Eyes and the NH Association for the Blind in the best fashion they both deserve from us.

At the heart of everything we do is our hopeful intent to tend the people of our community. These wonderful friends old and new are the foundation of hope and happiness for all that will come in the future and the not so secret means to saver every present moment.

Happy New Year to you all!

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Guest blog: Making radio with Randy and Autumn

By Arielle Zionts

I am a recent graduate of the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, ME. Over 15 weeks, Salt students study and make videos and multimedia. They also each chose to focus in writing, photography, or radio. Rather than focusing on pure reporting, Salt teaches narrative, documentary, and story-based work. Our stories have a beginning, middle, and an end. They have tension or a conflict that is either resolved or being addressed.

I was struggling to find a topic for my second radio story so I googled “miniature guide horse in Maine.” I thought it would be interesting to do a story about someone who uses a guide horse instead of a guide dog. However, Randy’s website appeared in my search results and I began to read about Randy, his dogs, and their adventures. I knew there was a story in Randy and his dogs but I wasn’t sure what it was at first. I was afraid of making a cliché story: man has disability, man pushes limits of disability, listeners feel inspired.

After conversing via e-mail, phone, and text message, conducting two formal interviews, and going on a walk and hike with Randy and Autumn, I knew my story. I was struck by the strength and, to be honest, the adorableness of Randy and Autumn’s relationship. I was also moved when he talked about his former dogs, Quinn and Ostend. My radio story was going to be a relationship story.

In “Guiding Eyes,” Randy’s long-term journey of bonding and training with Autumn is explored and represented through a hiking scene on Pack Monadnock. The story also focuses on the cycle Randy goes through with his guide dogs: getting paired up with a dog, training, working together, death, and repeat.

At Salt’s show opening last week, over 50 people were moved to the point of laughter and tears as they listened to Randy speak about his relationships with his dogs.

To listen to my other radio stories, click here.
To learn more about the Salt Institute, click here.

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Autumn learns to fly!

By Randy Pierce

Randy and Autumn trek through the airport on their way to their first plane trip together!
Randy and Autumn trek through the airport on their way to their first plane trip together!

As Autumn and I stroll through the airport and onto the plane, and then settle into a seat with her curled up against my feet on the floor in front of me, it may seem a simple process. For Guiding Eyes Autumn, December 4 was her debut flight and we thought we’d enlighten the many who have asked how the entire process works. Like most things, it begins with planning and preparation.

Thankfully the A.D.A. (American’s With Disabilities Act) ensures she is welcome to accompany me on a flight and not require any additional cost or ticket purchase. Guiding Eyes for the Blind has ensured that we as a team are trained for our part in the responsibilities involved. She has proven able to exceed the behavioral needs despite all the possible surprises which might arrive on a flight. I’ve been trained to ensure the ability to keep her within those expectations and properly educate the people around us through the process.

Depending on the length of flight and possibilities for relieving Autumn, I’ve adjusted her schedule of food and water to ensure she can fly comfortably without risk of an accident nor of insufficient nutrition and hydration. This is more difficult with the extended security approaches, although many airports have very kindly provided relieving stations beyond security. I have food ready for her immediately after we finish our flights.

Alerting the airlines 24 hours in advance is a courtesy which can also allow me to request bulkhead seating for us. On many airlines this has just a little more leg room which aids my 6’4” frame and her 65 lbs of Labrador  to cohabitate a little better. This time we are traveling with Tracy and may negotiate a little of her leg room too.

Autumn settles in at Randy's feet, ready for the long flight.
Autumn settles in at Randy’s feet, ready for the long flight.

On the day of the flight, we’ll arrive a little early and ensure her a final relief before braving the security process. They will usually expedite us through security and thereby ensure a Dog Guide trained scanner as well. She sits in a stay while I walk through the scanner (hopefully successfully though the blind guy not touching the sides is another interesting challenge). Then while they watch I call her through and typically the harness will set off the alarm so they’ll pat her down. Often this is a treat for Autumn and the scanning agent. We then resume to the gate and request early boarding to ease things a little more. Sitting in plain view of the gate reminds them we are there to help finalize that early boarding.

Sometimes a little interaction with a fellow flyer in our row helps build comforts though there’s an occasional flight with someone unhappy to share the row with a dog guide. The airline may move that person if it’s possible and most of the time soulful puppy eyes win over travelers.

We are allowed in any seat not designated as the emergency exit row. The airline may invite us to move for better comfort and if safety is involved they may direct us to do so, but in my 14 years of flying with a Dog Guide this has never yet happened. A blanket and chew toy complete the options for her comfort especially on her first flight. Eventually she may prove to be as stoic and relaxed as the Mighty Quinn or Ostend before her, but setting the trip for success in advance is key. The final part of that is to ensure her dog food made the trip as it may be harder to find across the country. Just to be safe, a full day’s supply is in my carry-on and her collapsible bowl is on her harness.

Now we are off and ready for new adventures together!

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Paying it forward: Thoughts on Peak Potential 2014

By Kim Kett Johnson

On Saturday night my husband Todd and I were fortunate enough to attend our 5th Peak Potential dinner and auction put on by 2020 Vision Quest and our friend Randy Pierce. We have attended all of the Peak Potential dinners over the past five years. Let’s face it, when you have three small children, having an annual event where you get to go out as a couple, dress up a little, and see many friends, all while supporting a fantastic cause is something we look forward to every year. I’d like to highlight a couple of the things I love most about the event.

Group photo of Randy and his fraternity brothers reuniting for a fun evening out.
Randy and his fraternity brothers reunite each year at Peak Potential for a fun social evening.

The social part: Randy Pierce and I have been friends since 1986. I see Randy and speak to Randy outside of the Peak Potential event, but every year at Peak Potential I reconnect with many other people who are mutual friends to Randy and me.

Many of these friends of ours are Randy’s fraternity brothers. Last night there were 18 brothers there so assuming each had a +1 that is 36 seats at the dinner that were there because of the brotherhood they share with Randy and with each other. A lot of people do not understand the bond and camaraderie of being in a fraternity or sorority but 30 years later the outpouring of support Randy’s fraternity brothers give him is fantastic to watch. This is definitely one of my favorite parts of the night. I was lucky enough last night to see a couple of my sorority sisters and my great friend and first roommate. We were all brought together by this wonderful event.

Kim gets into the spirit of the event by making a bid on silent auction items.
Kim gets into the spirit of the event by making a bid on silent auction items.

The philanthropic part: 2020 Vision Quest and Randy Pierce’s vision has grown to where he has introduced his message of true vision and believing in yourself despite adversity, to 34,000 students since the organization was started. How many of us can say we have touched the lives of tens of thousands of students over a few years? He is not stopping there. Randy spends his days traveling to any school that will have him in many states. All the efforts of Randy and 2020 Vision Quest benefit the organizations “Guiding Eyes for the Blind” and “The NH Association for the Blind”. Both of these organizations helped Randy in his darkest days when his vision of what his life would be like was much different than it is now. 2020 Vision Quest is the definition of “Paying It Forward.”

Everyone at Peak Potential pays for the dinner, bids on silent auction items, buys raffle tickets, bid on live auction items and some playfully bid against each other on bigger ticket items. It is a real tribute to Randy and what he and the 2020 Vision Quest organization has built as to how many people come out every year. Whether you have attended a Peak Potential before or are reading this and thinking about attending next year, I will see you there!

 Puppy dressed up with cuffs and bowtie
The next generation of Guide Dogs wants to know: Will we see you next year?

All photos courtesy of Kevin and Heather Green Photography.

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All our dogs are heroes: AKC Awards for Canine Excellence

By Randy Pierce

I have a bias, I admit, but I was surprised that Quinn didn’t at least merit honorable mention in the ACE Awards for Canine Excellence. Though without question there are some great and worthy stories both atop the awards and on the nomination room floor. After all, which of us doesn’t believe our dog or pet is the greatest? I think in part we feel that way because they spend their lives treating us as if WE are the greatest and it is so very difficult to not feel similarly towards them.

Take a “gander” and see why Gander took the top honors at this year’s Service Dog Category for the AKC Award for Canine Excellence.

Or maybe you want to learn why Gander’s Facebook page has nearly a quarter of a million followers!

“Let me be the person my dog thinks I am” – Anonymous

The truth is that Gander, Boomer, Bruno, Xander, and many other listed pups certainly deserve their accolades and credit to the AKC for honoring them. I know Modi, Ostend, Quinn, and Autumn all deserve the highest accolades I could ever give each of them, guiltless for my well deserved bias. I also know some remarkable pups by story or meeting such as Brutus, Salty, Conan, Maggie, Lady, Kiri, and a near endless list of others who have touched the lives of their humans and beyond.

Many teach us some essential skills in managing our own lives as we tend to over-complicate what they masterfully keep simple. In honor of all the dogs who have lifted my spirits, taught me lessons, and/or done similarly in the lives of all of you, I encourage you all to share on our blog a line or two about a cherished pet and why they earned your appreciative accolade for their excellence. I’ll start it off and end this blog with my own:

Puppy: Yes, Puppy Dog was on the scene when I arrived. She tolerated all of my youth and most importantly to love a dog

Tippy: She was my first “my dog” as a kid and she showed me the magic of life with her puppy litters and the many playful moments of them and her. She trusted me with her pups and I marvel at that love and trust now.

Modi: My first adult dog who patiently guided me to learn how to be a deserving partner to his love, loyalty, and devotion.

Ostend: My first Dog Guide and the last sight I ever saw in this world. My graceful charmer who lifted me through my darkest hours.

Quinn: He gave me so very much. He taught me to walk again, to run, and to reach heights I’d never imagined. Unrivaled devotion, determination, and perseverance are not nearly enough to do justice to his legend.

Autumn: Boundless, joyful affection and an earnest eager start that is so full of promise…

How about it? Any of you care to share a line or two in honor of our furry companions?

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Chocorua: An Autumn Hike with Friends!

By Randy Pierce

Autumn had previously climbed Mt. Agamenticus with students from S. Berwick Middle School, Pack Monadnock with a film crew for a documentary premiering in Maine this October, and Avalon, Field, and Tom with long-time friends. On this her fourth hike, she got to hike with Mom (Tracy!), John, Michelle, Kat, and of course that rather tall blind guy she kindly chooses to guide.

Perhaps of higher import to many of the team, Michelle’s dog Dina and John’s Guiding Eyes-released Frisco were also taking the journey with us. As the season of autumn draws ever closer, the mountains are already gifting cooler days which are ideal for hiking. The clouds were dramatic early while the weather only suggested a chance of rain showers later in the afternoon. We gathered a little later at the trailhead of Champney Falls and set to the gentle first miles of trail.

Autumn had been whining in excitement from the moment we stepped out of the car and had a bit too much eager determination to get into the woods. Putting the harness onto her calmed her down a bit, but not enough. A short but human-guided rock-stepping stream crossing started the trip and probably put her focus even a little further away, such that the first few hundred feet of work along the trail suggested she was tending her job but at a slightly more distracted level than is ideal.

I was making efforts to gain a better focus and enjoying that we were quickly traversing the easier footing when the first stumble arrived. She quickly was reminded that it was time to put her full attention on the job and aside from a few too tempting sniffs on the side she did this very well. Kat and Michelle had last seen my hiking when we finished our 48 on Mt. Liberty and Flume. Both quickly shared kind compliments on how far Autumn had come in such a short time. There’s no doubt that the learning and work done with Quinn enables me to be more aware of all the subtle aspects of possible Dog Guide communication through the harness. We glided nicely along for much of what many would struggle to believe is possible for a Dog Guide team. It does make me reflect in some appreciative humor on how many cues Quinn likely gave to me early which I was slow to learn. Despite this, Autumn doesn’t have it exactly easy as she not only fills big paw-prints but has some serious work.

Randy and Autumn at waterfall smilingThe cascading Champney Falls were a pretty side trail diversion which began the more challenging part of the route. Autumn’s confidence to guide forward no matter who is in front or behind paid some dividends as Tracy is freed to hike at her best comfort rather than needing to stay in front as Quinn effectively required.

A few stretches of trail were difficult enough and Autumn had worked hard enough that it made sense to give her a break and call upon a human Guide. Michelle undertook her first round of that leadership and adapted naturally to the many new perspectives and approaches required. I’ve become steadily more easy to guide as my understanding of trails and my own work grows but I’m always amazed by those willing to undertake the focus, effort, and attention to be a human Guide. Autumn was quite happy to resume her role and bring us ever closer to the summit.

The final half mile or so of the trail is up a moderately challenging summit cone and ensures all who travel get an appreciation for the work required. Here Autumn did some guiding and John did some guiding as we attempted to keep peak efficiency. Clouds were getting more dramatic and we wanted to enjoy the windy and cool summit prior to getting into tree cover for lunch. The summit was surprisingly crowded with hikers and dogs despite the trail having been lighter. Autumn’s distraction value was too high for safe work when combined with the realistic challenge we were facing. It was work to get her attention and a reminder why training is on-going in all facets of our work.

Group at summit

At the summit it was time to relax and appreciate the accomplishment, each of us in our own way. For Autumn it was a surprising indiscretion as she truly marked her territory in the ways of generations of the canine species!

For the generally more difficult descent, teamwork came in as three dogs were juggled on leash by Kat, Michelle, and Tracy while John helped me manage the most challenging of the down terrain. Lunch was a joyous celebration of food and pup interactions as we found a fairly private slab of stone to savor all that a mountain’s majesty inspires within us.

I attempted to work Autumn down the difficult dance of stopping for steps as I felt them out and then guided ahead. She did well for a bit but showed that mentally it was more demanding and she grew weary. John swooped in as the stunt double and Autumn was happy to be a bit of a dog as John’s skills at guiding enabled us to quickly traverse most trails. We kept up with the group for the most part and all had one of our strongest hikes.

When late on the trail rain began to pelt the tree canopy over us, we still kept sufficiently dry as to fully appreciate the day. Only as we cleared the final stream and reached our cars did the rain begin heavier and by then it was off to Flatbread Pizza Company and a guilt-free repast worthy of any hiker’s feast! Sometimes, it’s just about enjoying life and the friends with whom we share the trails.

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Just an Autumn Day in the Life

Randy sitting with Autumn curled at his feet.
Randy sitting with Autumn curled at his feet

By Randy Pierce

Today is Tuesday, September 9 – at least it is as I write this. After posting a couple of topic options on my Facebook feed the results quickly suggested people might prefer to get a glimpse into an ordinary day. While it’s not quite the Autumn day I suggest, in this house, every day is an Autumn day.

Still groggy from our late Monday night Hudson Lions Club meeting, the alarm tones at 5 a.m. since Tracy needs to be out early to avoid the traffic on her way to Duvine Bicycle Adventures in Somerville, MA. That’s all the signal Autumn needs to announce that her face licking, tail wagging energy will unleash upon me should I not begin the day with a trip outside for her needs and then her breakfast. This day, like many, will have a cup of coffee included as I sit by the computer and check messages to ensure the day is still on track. So why not join us for the day?

5:30 a.m.  Autumn relieved and fed first, then water, with banana and a quick breakfast for me at the PC. How many emails can I manage before the next tasks call?

6:00 a.m.  Dynamic warm-up and stretch in preparation for run training.

6:30 a.m.  5.45 mile run with Mary Guiding me and Autumn sulking at home.

7:30 a.m.  Shower and second breakfast for this calorie-counting (albeit tall) hobbit in training.

8:30 a.m.  Prioritize the To Do list which today includes:

  1. Response to Rick Stevenson on 2020 Vision Quest front page layout change in progress: School’s Back, Pet Tales E-book, Tuff Mudder, Corporate Presentation, TED Talk, UNH Award, Miles4Quinn and such!
  2. Response to Peak Potential auction donation.
  3. NHAB strategic planning update for Board of Directors.
  4. Sneak in a New England Patriot news update.
  5. Coordinate run training for rest of week.
  6. Finalize notes for Bank of NH keynote presentation scheduled for Thursday 9/11.
  7. Follow up on Kilimanjaro Preparations as team met on Mt. Monadnock last weekend and a few new members are being included. (Today is likely one year to the day from when we will summit Kilimanjaro, the tallest stand-alone mountain in the world. That’s pretty significant to me in many ways but a sign of just how every seemingly ordinary day can be connected to some very significant days as we choose to live our life in whatever experiences call to us.)
  8. Work with Sarah Toney via email to ensure 2020 Vision Quest social media plans are on track and she has the information she needs to best help our charity efforts online.
  9. Call Mom at her hospital room to coordinate her physical therapy plans and possibility of going home by end of week.
  10. Start draft of blog for Beth Foote and open up topic to Facebook.
  11. Check Status of Apple Watch in my search for a fully accessible wearable fitness device.
  12. Propose a new fundraising idea that has been on hold to a potential volunteer while giving an edit to a student’s note about what they believe we do as a 2020 Vision Quest team.
Autumn at play running with a toy.
Autumn at play.

11:00 a.m.  Hey, where is the day going? Start laundry, water and relieve Autumn who is impatient and deservedly so. Take a 2-mile walk to appease the girl, my legs and our practice time together as training with a Dog Guide is an every day opportunity to learn and grow as a team. Today’s challenge was wanting more time outside as the weather is beautiful. I suspect I’m not alone in this.

12:00 p.m.  Autumn follows the Quinn rules of “Playment plans!” This means after every bit of harness work we break out a toy and reward her with play. She is eager and energetic while I’m thinking about my own lunch (see hobbit comment from above!)

1:00 p.m.  Back to the computer for more work. I’ll spare you the details save that Apple’s info release is followed via Twitter feed on my iPhone. This makes my work a little distracted but 2020 Vision Quest usually involves 10 hours of work for me during the day. We interrupted to confirm the consult with Mom’s medical team and plan her return trip home on Friday afternoon.

4:00 p.m.  Feed, water and relieve the Autumn after a play session entirely intended to break me away from work mode. A burst of home chores to precede Tracy’s arrival and set the stage for our various discussions of the evening. While Tracy will have her own run training evening plans, I must research the weekend’s hike of Mt. Chocorua, a potential first-time yoga class on Friday, our “Iso-Abs” workout for tonight and the plan for our Peak Potential Dinner and Auction meeting on Sunday.

Autumn lies on top of Randy, pinning him to the floor.
Autumn shows Randy the price for lying down on the job!

Usually around 100 new emails will arrive during the day, requiring me to sort and respond as appropriate for the scheduling and planning of school and corporate presentations as well as general charity management. All this and it’s voting day here in our home city of Nashua, NH. Tired, well be careful lying down as there’s plenty ahead with an impending Autumn season… as well as an exuberant Dog Guide who needs to ensure I know the price of lying down on the job!

You want real updates on any of those topics? That would take an entire blog post for each and the days ahead will no doubt include such so stay connected to us in all the ways possible and thanks for coming along with me today!

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