5 Aug 17

By Randy Pierce

Randy and Jose running in the California International Marathon in 2014.

Randy and Jose running in the California International Marathon in 2014.

The arrival of August heralded the start of my training for the California International Marathon (CIM) for December 3. This is  where the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) hosts the National Marathon Championship I was very proud to win in 2014 (B1 Division). As I ramped up my own training, it gave me pause to consider the overall fitness and endurance I’ve been fortunate to maintain through my various other health challenges. I believe my general health and approach to preserving this health has been a benefit to my mental and emotional well-being along the way.

When I was providing a phone interview for Outside Magazine for a potential upcoming article, I read a little of the recent work on their Facebook page and found some support to my suggestion in a recent article written by Brad Stulberg titled “The 5 Most Basic Rules of Health and Fitness.”

The study cites research and knowledge from a physician at the Mayo clinic and I strongly encourage reading the full article. Two salient points I wanted to emphasize involve:

  1. The notion of doing something active every day
  2. Being engaged in something you find meaningful

Both of these are significant factors in living longer and healthier. Whatever fitness we have is the base from which we should appropriately engage in these two approaches whenever reasonable. I have not always been training for marathons or climbing mountains but I’ve usually been choosing to find something active and almost always engaged in something meaningful for me. In various ways, these are rooted into messages I share in my presentations as well. Life, like a marathon, is an endurance sport and with the right training plan we can cruise along and enjoy the experience better than if we face it without training or a plan. In both cases the real value and meaning is in enjoying the training and the entirety of the race, not just the moment of the finish line–no matter how epic it may seem.

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