22 Apr 17

By Randy Pierce

“Life is what happens while we are busy making other plans” – John Lennon

Guard House at Machu Picchu.

Guard House at Machu Picchu. On to new adventures!

Recently our focus has been upon the Boston Marathon and while this blog is written in response to it, the concepts are far broader for me. I finished the race in 5 hours and 3 minutes which was longer than I anticipated. It would be so easy to be frustrated and I admit to having endured a little more of that emotion than I would have preferred along the route. Most of the reason for any disappointment is due to expectations which simply didn’t account for all the events which took place to result in our race day experience.

So very often in our many journeys we hope to inflict our plans and our will upon the world and the influence we create can indeed be significant. Yet, when a host of additional factors are introduced, we should be prepared to adapt and adjust our approach as well as our expectations. This simple choice can ensure our ability to celebrate and savor appropriately all aspects of a situation despite any challenges or misdirection involved. Often, if we simply may change our mindset, we become open to the gifts and rewards present in those changes.

I did not anticipate or expect my life would include a journey to blindness. Initially I balked and resisted the journey with a range of approaches from denial, evasion, and even depression. Now, when I reflect upon my life’s journey, I certainly acknowledge that I would welcome my sight but still delight in the blindness for the lessons and gifts it has brought into my life have helped bring me to people and places I likely would not have experienced without the gifts my loss of sight brought to my life. Hard as that may be for some to believe, it took my personal acceptance and adaptation to realize that along with the detriments and real challenges came a wealth of benefits as well.

So when I reflect in my Marathon journey, there are many things about the day going differently which could have and did bring about frustration. I wish I’d have adjusted my mindset more quickly to appreciate some of the gifts. I’ll share just two of them here as evidence to my feeling.

Rebecca and Randy running in the Boston Marathon

Rebecca and Randy running strong! Photo courtesy of MA Association for the Blind.

A strategic error on my part caused the work of my first guide Rebecca to be tremendously more challenging for most of the first 13 miles and thus even made the final 5 of her 18 guiding miles more challenging. At the transition point we intended to just switch guides and go but we took a full stop for a moment to share and appreciate the work we’d just accomplished together. It was amongst the hardest 18 miles of guiding anyone had ever had to undertake and my pride of her and appreciation for her as a guide and as a friend was simply overflowing. That emotion sustains still and likely will for all time as a gift she gave me and as an achievement we earned together.

The second is similar in potency but vastly different in need. The circumstances of the race with collisions and falls had taken a toll on me. I have significant balance issues which once placed me in a wheelchair and which, when put under too much duress of the wrong type, can impact me tremendously.

Randy and Tom running along the Marathon route.

Randy and Tom working hard. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Jordan.

This was the state in which Tom roughly took over his guiding and as my vertigo began to ramp up beyond control, it was not possible for me to run in the normal rigid tether approach that we use. Tom was still recovering from being unwell, meaning barely over his own pneumonia! And what I needed was his sturdy shoulder for support as well as his run guidance. This was like no run we’d ever shared together. He was a rock and adapted, encouraged, supported and helped guide me, not just to the finish but to the celebration the accomplishment deserved despite my desire to be frustrated and disappointed and yes overly apologetic! My gift this day was to celebrate the race in a totally different way and better still to celebrate my finish with finer friends than even when we had begun the journey!

Thank you Rebecca and Tom! So perhaps when you are next facing change, frustration or disappointment you’ll remember John Lennon’s quote and more quickly find your way to see the gifts a better vision provides us all if we only learn to look.

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2 Comments.

  • Suzanne Barker says:

    Beautifully written, Randy. I had a blind runner with two guides pass me around mile 14. The amount of effort for them to make it through the crowd was evident. I thought of you and your new guide Rebecca and how difficult it must be for each of you.

    Thank you for sharing and good lesson for all of us to continue to strive for in our daily journey.

  • Randy says:

    Thank you Susan – no doubt crowded courses provide a little extra challenge for the sight impaired and our guides. Ultimately I love the freedom to be out there which I don’t have without such wonderful guides as Rebecca and Tom (and many others through the years and miles of races and training). For those wanting to explore guiding opportunities, there is a website: unitedinstride.org to help connect guides and sight impaired runners.




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