10 Oct 15

By Randy Pierce

IRandy presenting’m very appreciative to be providing a second TED talk on Friday, October 9 at TEDx-Springfield. Being invited once was a great honor and this second time was beyond my expectations. As such, I’ve prepared a slightly different topic and in that process wanted to answer a common question: How do I prepare for presentations? My braille use is not strong enough for me to use prepared notes and I’m obviously not able to look at the telestrator. While I could potentially use an ear bud, that adds an array of complications which I choose to avoid. So how do I actually prepare?

First, I develop an outline based on simple bullet points of what I wish to cover. For TEDx-Springfield which has a theme of “A Brand New Day” I  wanted to address what I’ve come to call “Transition Trauma.” This is the notion that when faced with change or challenge it is initially much harder for us to accept or manage than it will typically become after we’ve had time to accept, evaluate, educate and begin moving forward. How long that process takes is significantly influenced by the approach we take. I can make the obvious parallel to that process being the dawn of a new day for us. While I’m including a secondary topic from there involving the concept of “Social Risk Management” for this blog I’ll just address that first piece.

So I have the first bullet point of the title/theme of my talk and that’s a great start. My second goal is to have something which will capture the attention of the audience and hopefully entice them to want to hear a bit more of the process. In this instance, I ask them right away to imagine a somewhat abrupt transition, going blind, and then suggest I believe they got the imagining wrong and I want to show them how/why. So that’s my second bullet point and a pretty easy two step process thus far.

My next step in the process is to write out a sample of the script as I might deliver it. This allows me to choose wording which both feels natural for me and establishes a flow for the presentation. I rarely force myself to memorize this but rather use it to help me feel comfortable with the concept for which I’ll present. I evaluate possible life anecdotes which are worthy of sharing to highlight additional bullet points in the conversation and I do ultimately attempt to memorize the bullet points to help me work through the full presentation. My final step is to practice while being able to flick through bullet points to remind myself along the way. I typically record myself and play back the recording to help me understand the time and feel of my presentation. Several iterations of this practice and I’m usually ready to deliver. On the day of the event I will listen to my written script and bullet points again not for memorization but one last comfort of the process. By way of example I share with you the opening paragraph for my TEDX talk:

“Imagine at this very moment you are suddenly stricken totally blind! What does this mean for your life and your future?

It’s more probable than not that you got that imagining wrong!!

That’s a bold assertion on my part and I’d like to show you why I’ve made it as well as how that reason might enlighten you going forward.”

Hopefully you’ll all have access to that full talk in the very near future. In the meanwhile I thought this an excellent opportunity to share with you my prior TEDX-Amoskeag talk which was released on the web earlier this year.


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